Protesters speak, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. A grand jury has indicted one officer on criminal charges six months after Breonna Taylor was fatally shot by police in Kentucky. The jury presented its decision against fired officer Brett Hankison Wednesday to a judge in Louisville, where the shooting took place.
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Protesters speak, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, in Louisville, Ky. A grand jury has indicted one officer on criminal charges six months after Breonna Taylor was fatally shot by police in Kentucky. The jury presented its decision against fired officer Brett Hankison Wednesday to a judge in Louisville, where the shooting took place.
Credit: AP Photo/John Minchillo

Thursday on Political Rewind, the grand jury’s decision in the Breonna Taylor case has again raised questions and concerns about police accountability and conduct. In the aftermath of protests in cities across the country last night, we take a deeper look at the movement to reform and reimagine the police. 

According to The New York Times, police duties entail a wide array of responsibilities — only about 4% of which involve handling violent crime. Activists and advocates have increasingly called for reform in law enforcement policies, procedures and culture, and for the nation's municipalities to redirect both police duties and funds to other services and resources better trained to handle nonviolent scenarios. 

We unpack what "defunding" the police could actually mean and look like, and how that could change the role of police in our communities.

Panelists:

Ceasar Mitchell – Former president, Atlanta City Council

Dr. Dean Dabney – Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, Georgia State University

Tiffany Williams Roberts – Community Engagement & Movement Building Counsel,Southern Center for Human Rights

Kevin Riley – Editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution