Esther Muhammad of Macon wears  a t-shirt featuring an image of her son Daniel, who was killed in 2013 after being hit by a car. The police determined that his death was a suicide, but his mom doesn't believe it.
Caption
Esther Muhammad of Macon wears a t-shirt featuring an image of her son Daniel, who was killed in 2013 after being hit by a car. The police determined that his death was a suicide, but his mom doesn't believe it.

Macon-Bibb County officials meet later this month to discuss why the rate of pedestrian fatalities is so high in the city. It’s either the most deadly or close to the most deadly county in the state for walkers, depending on how you count it. Chris Tsavatewa of the Macon-Bibb Board of Health tells us why he's made pedestrian safety a top issue. We also hear from Angie Schmitt of Streetsblog USA, who says pedestrian fatalities are on the rise nationwide.

 

In 2015, On Second Thought guest host Adam Ragusea worked with Mercer University journalism students to show how pedestrian fatalities cut into Macon-Bibb County's psyche. These stories were produced in partnership with GPB, the Telegraph, and Mercer University’s Center for Collaborative Journalism.Can educating drivers and pedestrians on road safety play a major role in reducing fatalities? Mercer student reporter Taylor Harter looked at those who want to emphasize education in reducing roadway deaths.When it comes to road safety, not all neighborhoods are affected equally. Mercer University student reporter Erica O’Neal takes us to one place that has seen more than its share of tragedy.

As part of this series, The Telegraph featured a number of stories, including how poverty and poor roads combine to make highways less safe and solutions such as devices that can alert drivers to those crossing the road.