Musicians Dom Flemons, Rhiannon Giddens and Justin Robinson, of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, pose with the award for best traditional folk album at the Grammy Awards. Their music is inspired by the Appalachian region.
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Musicians Dom Flemons, Rhiannon Giddens and Justin Robinson, of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, pose with the award for best traditional folk album at the Grammy Awards. Their music is inspired by the Appalachian region.

"The Beverly Hillbillies" introduced audiences to the Clampett family in the 1960s and helped popularize the stereotype of the "Dumb Southerner." The myth persists today, wrapped up with ideas about tolerance, race and intelligence.

Marie T. Cochran, director of the Affrilachia Artist Project, joined "On Second Thought" to dig into this idea and her experiences growing up in Appalachia. Chuck Reece, host of "The Bitter Southerner Podcast," also joined the conversation.

"On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott speaks with Marie T. Cochrin and Chuck Reece.

Cochran wrote an article for Rewire.News, "I Pledge Allegiance to Affrilachia," which discussed her childhood and the historical erasure of black people in the region. Her organization, the Affrilachia Artist Project, supports artists of color preserving and celebrating Appalachian history.

"Ultimately, when these poor people come together, they make music, they make babies, they make community," Cochran said. "We need to come together because we have so much in common and that's the richness of the South."

 

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