Fishing isn't just a way to make a living for many along the Georgia coast; it's also a way of life.
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Fishing isn't just a way to make a living for many along the Georgia coast; it's also a way of life.

For generations, the Georgia coast has been home to folks who have made their living on the water. A new oral history project aims to trace the traditions and changes in small-scale fishing through firsthand accounts.

Georgia Southern University anthropology professor Jennifer Sweeney Tookes and University of Georgia Marine Extension associate director Bryan Fluech are leading a team of anthropology students in compiling "Fishing Traditions and Fishing Futures: Oral Histories of Commercial Fishing in Georgia."

"On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott speaks with Jennifer Sweeney Tookes and Bryan Fluech.

Tookes and Fluech joined "On Second Thought" from GPB's studio in Savannah.