Photographer Walker Evans
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Photographer Walker Evans

Look through the lens of photographer Walker Evans, and you'll find a poignant and poetic view of American life. Evans is considered one of the most influential American photographers of the 20th century. A new exhibit at Atlanta’s High Museum looks back at his 50-year career. We talked with the show’s curator, Brett Abbott and Atlanta-native Alex Harris, who studied photography under Evans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlXfbixbGG8

In the mid-1970s, Evans used Polaroid technology to construct images with startling color juxtapositions.
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In the mid-1970s, Evans used Polaroid technology to construct images with startling color juxtapositions.
Evans prowled the New York City underground, discreetly snatching likenesses of the passengers who surrounded him.
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Evans prowled the New York City underground, discreetly snatching likenesses of the passengers who surrounded him.
Evans created some of his most iconic and recognizable work during a tremendously productive thirteen months from June 1935 to the summer of 1936. This was taken at a barbershop in Atlanta.
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Evans created some of his most iconic and recognizable work during a tremendously productive thirteen months from June 1935 to the summer of 1936. This was taken at a barbershop in Atlanta.
In advance of an exhibition of African sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art in New York hired Walker Evans to photograph the collection of nearly 500 objects from which the show was drawn.
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In advance of an exhibition of African sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art in New York hired Walker Evans to photograph the collection of nearly 500 objects from which the show was drawn.
In 1933, Evans went to Cuba on a photo assignment. This work prefigured his photography of the Depression-era South.
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In 1933, Evans went to Cuba on a photo assignment. This work prefigured his photography of the Depression-era South.
In the summer 1936, Evans worked with a friend on a photo project in Hale County, Alabama. They documented three families of tenant farmers.
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In the summer 1936, Evans worked with a friend on a photo project in Hale County, Alabama. They documented three families of tenant farmers.
Evans often playfully juxtaposed text and image in his work. For this photograph, Evans captured a seemingly oxymoronic sign as men loaded it onto a New York City truck.
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Evans often playfully juxtaposed text and image in his work. For this photograph, Evans captured a seemingly oxymoronic sign as men loaded it onto a New York City truck.