A health care worker (left) administers a coronavirus test at a mobile walk-up testing site at Crandon Park in Miami last month.
Caption
A health care worker (left) administers a coronavirus test at a mobile walk-up testing site at Crandon Park in Miami last month.

NPR is tracking coronavirus-related developments in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia so you can read up on your state's COVID-19 response and how it compares to others. This rundown focuses on statewide measures — local jurisdictions may vary.

Part of a series on coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Jump to a state: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, other states

Alabama

What's the big picture?

  • Alabama is operating under an amended "Safer at Home" order, which is the second phase of a three-part reopening plan and allows businesses and services to operate subject to safety guidelines. The latest version of the order extends until Dec. 11.
  • A statewide mask order requires people to wear face coverings when they are within six feet of non-household members in indoor and certain outdoor public spaces, as well as on vehicles operated by a transportation service.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which shows cases, deaths, tests, recoveries and hospitalizations, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Non-work gatherings are required by state order to maintain six feet of distance between people from different households.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can operate in line with sanitation and social distancing guidelines. Restaurants, bars and breweries can open with limited table seating. Beaches are open with no capacity limits. Athletic activities are allowed, and athletic facilities are open.
  • Visitation at hospitals and nursing homes is restricted to one caregiver or visitor at a time. Regular programming at senior citizen centers is suspended, though meals are available through curbside pickup or delivery.
  • The latest version of the amended Safer at Home order removes emergency occupancy rates for retailers, gyms and entertainment venues. It also makes an exception to social distancing rules for businesses where people are wearing masks and separated by partitions.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • The state's dashboard of COVID-19 cases associated with K-12 schools is here.
  • School reopening plans vary by district.

What should I know about testing?

  • People should get tested if they have COVID-19 symptoms, and wait 3-4 days to get tested after known exposure to the virus, state health officials recommend. A spreadsheet of testing site locations and hours of operation is available here.
  • State-run laboratories, as opposed to commercial, are prioritizing certain groups for testing. Those include residents of long-term care facilities, hospitalized patients, healthcare workers, first responders and individuals with underlying conditions.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • The state's ALtogether website has information about resources for municipalities, businesses, nonprofits and individuals.

Arkansas

What's the big picture?

  • Arkansas has been in Phase 2 of its economic reopening plan since June, allowing most businesses and services to operate in line with safety guidelines. Gov. Asa Hutchinson established a COVID-19 Winter Task Force to make recommendations for the state's response to a surge in cases and hospitalizations.
  • A statewide mask directive requires individuals to wear face coverings in indoor and outdoor settings where they are exposed to non-household members and cannot maintain six feet of distance.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which shows cases and other metrics by county, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A directive issued in March limits indoor and outdoor gatherings to a maximum of ten people, with exceptions for settings including workplaces, places of worship and unenclosed outdoor spaces where social distancing is feasible.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses and activities including sports can operate in line with health and safety requirements.
  • A directive effective Nov. 20 through Jan. 3 requires restaurants, bars and private clubs that are licensed to sell and allow on-premise consumption of alcohol to close by 11 p.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Information and resources for public school students and families are collected here.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials recommend anyone who is experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or thinks they may have been exposed to schedule a test. Tests are available by appointment through Local Health Units. A spreadsheet of testing locations is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Industry-specific resources for businesses, employees and customers are available here. Information about federal and state assistance for businesses is here, and unemployment resources are here.
  • Information about mental health resources is here.

Delaware

What's the big picture?

  • Delaware has been in Phase 2 of its reopening plan since June, and has delayed Phase 3 and tightened restrictions on gatherings and certain businesses in response to an increase in cases.
  • Individuals who are in kindergarten and older are required to wear face coverings in indoor and outdoor public settings, including during exercise and in school buildings, bars and restaurants.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks public health metrics including cases and hospitalizations, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Under guidance effective Nov. 23, indoor gatherings in private homes are limited to a maximum of 10 people. Outdoor public gatherings are capped at 50 people, or up to 250 with a plan approved by public health officials.
  • Indoor gatherings outside of homes, such as weddings, political events and religious services, are limited to 30% of the venue's stated fire capacity, up to 50 people.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • In Phase 2, most businesses and services are operating with occupancy limits and other general and industry-specific requirements.
  • Sporting facilities and venues, indoor children's play areas and water parks cannot open unless they create and submit facility-specific plans for observing guidance and limiting capacity.
  • Under new restrictions, restaurants can operate at no more than 30% occupancy indoors. Starting Dec. 1, youth sports organizations, teams and venues cannot host or participate in tournaments with out-of-state teams.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Based on the state's classification system for community spread, schools can operate under a hybrid model of remote and in-person learning. A decrease to "minimal" community spread would allow schools to operate in person, while an increase to "significant" community spread would require buildings to close.

What should I know about testing?

  • People experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, who have had close contact with a confirmed case, who work certain high-risk jobs or have been referred for testing by their healthcare provider should get tested, according to state health officials, who also recommend that people who do not meet these criteria get tested once a month. Additional testing guidance and information is available here.
  • State residents can get tested in person or request at-home testing kits.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Housing, food, unemployment and other resources are available here. Apply for various benefits here.
  • Information about mental health resources is here.
  • Assistance for small businesses is here.

District of Columbia

What's the big picture?

  • Washington, D.C. has been in Phase 2 of its reopening plan since June, but has tightened restrictions on gatherings and certain businesses as cases surge nationwide.
  • People must wear face coverings when they leave their homes "if they are likely to come into contact with another person for more than a fleeting moment," under a mayor's order, with few exceptions.
  • The District's COVID-19 dashboards are here. They track cases, tests, hospital capacity, community spread and other metrics that help determine the severity of its restrictions.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Under Phase 2 adjustments effective Nov. 25, outdoor gathering limits are reduced to 25 people and indoor gatherings must not exceed 10 people. The number of people inside houses of worship at any one time is reduced to 50 people or 50% capacity, whichever number is lower.
  • Visitors must get tested within 72 hours of their departure for D.C. and, if staying for more than three days, must get tested again within 3-5 days of their arrival.
  • D.C. residents returning from places other than Virginia, Maryland or a designated low-risk state or country must limit their daily activities and self-monitor either for 14 days or for 3-5 days until they get tested and receive a negative result. As of Nov. 23, Hawaii is the only state not considered high risk.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Most businesses and services can operate, in line with general and industry-specific guidance. Non-essential, non-retail businesses are strongly encouraged to continue teleworking.
  • Starting Nov. 25, restaurants may stay open until midnight but must stop on-premises alcohol service, sales and consumption by 10 p.m.
  • Gyms, private trainers and other recreation services must suspend all indoor group exercises classes and outdoor group classes of 25 people or more.
  • Starting Dec. 14, the maximum indoor capacity of restaurants will be reduced from 50% to 25%.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Public schools are operating online-only, with students learning at home or in supervised "CARE Classrooms." Information, resources and updates are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Residents ages 3 and up experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or with known exposure to the virus should get a test, according to health officials. They encourage individuals to get tested through their health care provider whenever possible.
  • People can get tested by appointment at a healthcare provider or walk into public testing sites, as well as request at-home testing. Details about testing options and locations are here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for businesses and individuals are available here. Food resources are here.

Florida

What's the big picture?

  • All counties have been in Phase 3 of Florida's reopening plan since late September, which allows additional businesses and services to operate with capacity limits. It also suspends all outstanding COVID-19-related fines and penalties applied against individuals.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate. A July public health advisory recommends individuals wear face masks in any indoor or outdoor setting where social distancing is not possible.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks metrics including cases, hospitalizations, deaths and positivity rates, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • State public health officials recommend that individuals refrain from social or recreational gatherings of more than 10 people.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • In Phase 3, businesses and recreational facilities can operate without capacity limits, including restaurants, bars, retail, gyms, entertainment venues and personal care services.
  • An executive order states that restaurants cannot be limited by local orders to less than 50% of their indoor capacity.
  • A September emergency order lifted visitation restrictions on long-term care facilities.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Families can choose between in-person and remote learning, with the majority of public school students learning in person in the fall. An executive order for the spring semester requires all schools to stay open and enact certain improvements, such as holding educational interventions for students who have fallen behind. Learning resources and other school information is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • People can get tested regardless of whether they are experiencing symptoms. Information about free public testing sites sponsored by the state and other entities is available here. People with questions about eligibility or access to testing can also contact the state's COVID-19 Call Center at 1-866-779-6121.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about resources available to individuals and businesses is here. Mental health resources are here.

Georgia

What's the big picture?

  • Georgia has lifted most statewide restrictions.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, though local mandates are allowed and the governor's executive orders "strongly encourage" individuals to wear face coverings outside of their place of residence except for when eating, drinking and exercising.
  • A daily report of the state's cases, deaths, hospitalizations and tests is available here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Gatherings of more than 50 people at a single location are prohibited by executive order, if they would need to be within six feet of each other.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses are open and must follow sanitation and social distancing guidelines. Sector-specific resources are here.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School plans and operations vary by district. Guidance for districts, and information for students and families, can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Testing is available to all residents who request it, regardless of whether they have symptoms, according to public health officials. Information about testing options and locations is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Guidelines for businesses and employers are here. Information about support for small businesses is here.
  • Resources for families and individuals are here.

Kentucky

What's the big picture?

  • Kentucky began a phased approach to reopening economic sectors in May. It tightened restrictions on social gatherings, schools and several kinds of businesses in November.
  • A statewide order requires people to wear face coverings inside most indoor public spaces, on public transportation and in outdoor settings where physical distancing is not feasible.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which shows cases, deaths and other metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • As of Nov. 20, all indoor social gatherings are limited to a maximum of two households and no more than eight individuals.
  • Kentucky's travel advisory recommends a 14-day self-quarantine for any individuals who visited states reporting a positive testing rate equal to or higher than 15%.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can operate following universal requirements and sector-specific guidelines.
  • Under tightened restrictions effective Nov. 20 through Dec. 13, indoor dining at bars and restaurants is prohibited. Gyms and fitness centers cannot offer group classes and must limit capacity to 33%. Retail stores and personal care businesses must close their seating and waiting areas and limit capacity to 50%. Indoor venues and event spaces, including weddings and funerals, can hold no more than 25 people per room.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Public and private schools stopped offering in-person instruction on Nov. 23. Middle and high schools will remain remote until Jan. 4. Elementary schools can reopen starting Dec. 7 if their county is not in the red zone and if they follow safety guidance. More information about schools is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Find testing locations here. Drive-through testing at certain locations is available to anyone who wants a test, according to state officials.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Business-related resources and reopening plans are here. Other assistance and guidance can be found here.

Louisiana

What's the big picture?

  • Louisiana moved back to a modified Phase 2 at the end of November, tightening occupancy limits at certain businesses, decreasing gathering sizes and limiting indoor service at bars and restaurants.
  • A statewide mask mandate requires individuals to wear face coverings in indoor public spaces and in any public settings where they are near non-household members.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks tests, cases and deaths, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • State orders encourage individuals to avoid gathering with people who are not a part of their household.
  • Gatherings at event venues and reception centers are limited to 25% capacity or a maximum of 75 individuals indoors, and 25% capacity or 150 individuals outdoors where physical distancing is not feasible.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • In modified Phase 2, businesses are encouraged to work remotely when possible. Restaurants are limited to 50% indoor capacity. Bars in parishes above 5% positivity must close for indoor sale and consumption but can open for outdoor consumption at 25% capacity with a maximum of 50 people.
  • Gyms, personal care service businesses, movie theaters and non-essential retail businesses can operate at 50% capacity.
  • Places of worship can operate at 75% capacity. Sporting events are capped at 25%.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School plans vary by district. After the state returned to a modified Phase 2, the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education authorized localities to choose to continue following the Phase 3 minimum requirements for reopening school facilities.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials recommend testing for anyone experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. More information about testing locations and turnaround time is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about resources and assistance for both individuals and businesses can be found here. Resources for parents are here.

Maryland

What's the big picture?

  • Maryland is in Phase 3 of its reopening plan, but reimposed certain restrictions on some businesses, gatherings and other activities in November as community transmission worsened. 
  • Individuals over the age of five are required to wear masks in public spaces of all facilities and businesses, including any work area where interaction with others is likely, as well as in outdoor areas where social distancing isn't feasible.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks cases, hospitalizations and other data, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A Nov. 10 public health advisory discourages public and private gatherings of more than 25 people in one location.
  • Maryland recommends residents or visitors arriving from out of state get tested either promptly after their arrival or within 72 hours before travel. Residents who travel to a state with a test positivity rate above 10% or with a case rate over 20 per 10,000 in the past seven days should get tested and self-quarantine until they receive their test result. Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. are exempt from the recommendation.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Most businesses are operating, in adherence with general and sector-specific guidelines.
  • An emergency order effective Nov. 11 reduces indoor operations at bars and restaurants to 50%. 
  • Starting Nov. 20, all bars, restaurants and venues serving food and alcohol must close between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. except for takeout and delivery. Capacity at retail stores and religious facilities decreased to 50%, in line with personal service businesses, gyms and other recreation venues.
  • An emergency order prohibits hospital visitation with some exceptions and limits indoor visitation at nursing homes to compassionate care.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Data about COVID-19 outbreaks associated with schools is here.
  • Operational plans vary by district. More information for schools and families can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials recommend testing for anyone who suspects exposure, regardless of symptoms, as well as those who are at risk of exposure because of their job. They also advise people to get tested if they have recently traveled or attended large gatherings. Find testing sites here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about assistance for adults and children is here. Resources for businesses and employers are here.

Mississippi

What's the big picture?

  • Mississippi is under a "Safe Recovery" order, under which all businesses can operate with capacity limits and other restrictions. Executive orders with more restrictive gathering limits and mask requirements apply to many counties through Dec. 11.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, though health officials encourage people to wear masks in public. Masks are required indoors in public places in designated high-risk counties. 
  • An interactive map of COVID-19 cases and deaths by county is here, and a dashboard tracking cases, deaths and long-term care facility outbreaks is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Gatherings in certain high-risk counties are limited to 10 people indoors and 50 outdoors where social distancing is not possible.
  • A governor's order limits gatherings and group activities to 20 people indoors and 100 people outdoors if individuals from different households are less than 6 feet apart.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Under the Safe Recovery order, all businesses can operate, with certain services and activities restricted.
  • Retail businesses, gyms, restaurants and bars can operate at 75% capacity and in line with other safety requirements. Bar hours are reduced to between 7 a.m. - 11 p.m., and only seated customers can be served.
  • Visitation at nursing homes and long-term care facilities is limited to residents receiving end-of-life care, with facilities required to discontinue group social activities and visits.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Weekly reports of COVID-19 cases and exposures associated with schools are here.
  • School guidelines and updates can be found here. Public health guidance for K-12 schools is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Cost of, and eligibility for, COVID-19 testing varies by provider. Free testing is available regardless of symptoms to college and university students, faculty and staff, as well as child care facility workers. Information about testing sites is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about unemployment assistance is here. Other resources for workers and business are here, and more COVID-19 relief programs are here.

North Carolina

What's the big picture?

  • North Carolina is paused in Phase 3 of its reopening plan through at least Dec. 4. It tightened restrictions in November, lowering the mass gathering limit and strengthening its face covering requirement.
  • An executive order effective Nov. 25 through Dec. 11 expands the state's mask mandate, requiring face coverings in all public indoor settings with non-household members present, regardless of social distancing. It also requires masks to be worn while exercising indoors and at restaurants except for when eating or drinking. Maskless passengers may be denied entry to public transportation, and face covering requirements are newly enforceable against individuals by law enforcement.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks metrics including cases and hospitalizations, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Gatherings are limited to 10 people indoors and 50 people outdoors, at least through Dec. 4.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • In Phase 3, businesses and entertainment venues are open with occupancy limits and other safety measures.  Indoor areas of bars and amusement parks are closed.
  • An executive order in effect Nov. 25 through Dec. 11 strengthens the mask requirement and requires large retail businesses with more than 15,000 square feet to have an employee stationed near entrances to ensure mask wearing and enforce occupancy limits.
  • Alcohol sales for in-person consumption at restaurants and outdoor bars are prohibited between the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Public schools can choose to open for in-person learning, remote learning, or a mix of both. Guidance for schools and resources for families can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Health officials recommend testing for people who have symptoms, close contacts of known cases, populations with higher risk of exposure and/or underlying conditions and people who have attended large gatherings. Find testing locations here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Mental health and wellness resources are here. Information about assistance and various human services is here.

Oklahoma

What's the big picture?

  • Oklahoma has been in Phase 3 of its reopening plan since June, and imposed stronger safety measures for bars, restaurants and state employees in November after a rise in hospitalizations.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, though state health officials recommend individuals wear face coverings around others. As of Nov. 17, all state employees under the executive branch and visitors to state agency buildings must wear face coverings in common areas and around other people.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing cases, deaths and other health metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Individuals entering the state from an area of "substantial community spread" must wear a face covering in all public spaces and limit their participation in indoor gatherings for 10-14 days, under the "Safer in Oklahoma" policy.
  • There are no gathering size limits in Phase 3, provided groups "consider social distancing."

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • In Phase 3, businesses and services are open with few restrictions, and must follow CDC and sector-specific safety guidelines.
  • As of Nov. 19, restaurants are required to space tables six feet apart unless they are separated by sanitized dividers, and all bars and restaurants must close to in-person service by 11 p.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School openings vary by district, with plans and other resources available here.
  • Member station KOSU is tracking school districts with COVID-19 cases here.

What should I know about testing?

  • County health department testing appointments are available by phone. Some testing sites may have eligibility requirements. A list of locations is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about resources for individuals and businesses can be found here.

Puerto Rico

What's the big picture?

  • After a lengthy lockdown, Puerto Rico began an incremental reopening process in May and gradually eased restrictions on many sectors while leaving an island-wide curfew in place. Officials have since reimposed restrictions, most recently on business occupancy limits, and the curfew will remain in effect between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. until Dec. 11.
  • Face masks have been mandatory since May.
  • A COVID-19 dashboard with cases, deaths and other health metrics is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Puerto Rico is encouraging essential travel only. Visitors must fill out a travel declaration form, get a molecular-based COVID-19 test within 72 hours prior to their trip and show proof of a negative test result or else quarantine for 14 days or the duration of their visit, whichever is shorter.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Under new restrictions announced Nov. 13, businesses including malls, restaurants and retail stores are limited to 30% occupancy, in line with existing limits at movie theaters, gyms and casinos. Religious services and funerals, as well as public pools, are limited to 30% occupancy.
  • Public beaches are open only for individual sports. Recreational areas and bars remain closed.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Officials announced in July that public schools would begin the year virtually. 
  • Puerto Rico's Department of Education news and resources can be found here

What should I know about testing?

  • An interactive map of the island's testing sites can be found here. As of November, free rapid testing is also available at toll booths on weekends.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Contact information for help lines and human services is at the bottom of this page.
  • Information about assistance for individuals is here, information about business assistance is here and federal economic resources are here.

South Carolina

What's the big picture?

  • South Carolina is progressing through its reopening plan, allowing businesses and services to operate with some prohibitions. Guidelines for restaurants and certain other establishments that had previously only been recommended became mandatory in early August, and the governor left those in place but removed restaurant occupancy limits in October.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, but local governments are encouraged to enact their own ordinances, which are available here. An executive order requires face coverings to be worn in state government facilities, restaurants and certain large gatherings.
  • State COVID-19 dashboards showing cases, deaths and other health metrics are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Health officials recommend anyone who traveled in the past 14 days stay home as much as possible and wear a mask in public. Individuals who participated in higher-risk activities or think they may have been exposed are encouraged to "take extra precautions" for 14 days upon arrival, including getting tested, .
  • A Nov. 25 executive order enacted restrictions on gatherings, limiting their maximum size to no more than 50% of the location's occupancy limit or 250 people, whichever is less. Attendees are required to wear face coverings, and alcohol cannot be sold or consumed at any gatherings between the hours of 11 p.m. and 10 a.m. State approval is required for events larger than 250 people.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses are open in line with sector-specific guidelines. Those include indoor establishments like restaurants, entertainment venues, and fitness centers, as well as outdoor activities including festivals, playgrounds, attractions and beaches.
  • An October executive order lifted occupancy limitations in restaurants statewide, allowing them to operate at 100% capacity with masks required, tables spaced six feet apart and other safety measures in place. The sale and consumption of alcohol at restaurants is prohibited after 11 p.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A dashboard of COVID-19 cases associated with students and school staff is here.
  • Reopening plans vary by district. A map showing the operational status of the state's school districts is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials say anyone who would like to get tested should do so, and recommend routine testing for individuals with known exposures or concerns about exposures. They also recommend that individuals who are "frequently out in the community" get tested at least once a month, regardless of symptoms. Find testing sites here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

Tennessee

What's the big picture?

  • State officials have lifted restrictions, including capacity limits, on businesses and gatherings in most of Tennessee's counties. Several counties in the state have locally-run health departments that can act independently. 
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, though health officials strongly encourage people to wear face coverings in public places where "close proximity to others is anticipated." A July executive order granted local governments in most counties the authority to issue local mask ordinances, and that has been extended through Dec. 29.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboards, showing cases, deaths and other health data, are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A September executive order removed limits on social and recreational gatherings, encouraging individuals to "exercise good faith judgment" in practicing social distancing tailored to each occasion. It applies to the counties with a state-run health department.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses are open in line with general and sector-specific guidance under the "Tennessee Pledge."
  • In October, updated guidelines removed capacity limits on attractions and entertainment venues and allowed additional facilities, like playgrounds and unstaffed hotel gyms, to reopen.
  • An October executive order removed restrictions on businesses in counties with state-run health departments. It also requires people with COVID-19 or virus symptoms to stay home.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School opening plans vary by district. The operational status of each district, as well as the numbers of COVID-19 cases associated with schools, are updated on this dashboard.
  • Tennessee Department of Education guidance and resources are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • A testing site locator is here. State officials recommend calling non-health department sites in advance.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about resources for individuals, families, educators and businesses can be found here.

Texas

What's the big picture?

  • Texas began reopening in May, but reimposed certain restrictions on businesses, gatherings and elective procedures over the summer as cases surged. It has since increased capacity limits for some businesses in lower-risk counties.
  • A mask mandate issued in July requires individuals to wear a face covering in public spaces in counties with 20 or more COVID-19 cases, with some exceptions.
  • The state's main COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks cases, fatalities and other metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Outdoor gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited, unless they have been approved by the relevant city mayor or county judge.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • An October executive order allows most businesses to operate at 75% capacity if they are located in a county with a low number of hospitalizations. Those businesses in areas with high hospitalizations can operate at 50% capacity. Counties with minimal case counts can apply for higher occupancy limits even if they are in higher-hospitalization areas. More information is here.
  • Certain sectors and activities do not have occupancy limits, including religious services, child care, recreational sports programs, schools, drive-in entertainment and personal care service businesses that operate with six feet or more between work stations.
  • Bars can operate pending local approval if they are located in counties with low hospitalizations, or if their area has been granted higher occupancy limits. They are limited to 50% capacity and patrons can only eat or drink while seated.
  • Businesses must abide by general and sector-specific health protocols.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A state dashboard showing COVID-19 cases in public schools is here.
  • Resources and guidance for schools and families can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Individuals can use the state's online self-checker to determine whether they should get tested for COVID-19. Testing is offered at public sites and drive-through locations, which can be found here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about public health and economic resources is here.

Virginia

What's the big picture?

  • Virginia has been in Phase 3 of its reopening plan since July. In November, it ramped up restrictions, including on gathering size and on-site alcohol consumption, in an effort to maintain its relatively low case count.
  • An expanded mask mandate effective Nov. 15 requires individuals ages five and older to wear face coverings in indoor public places; the minimum age had previously been 10.
  • The commonwealth's COVID-19 dashboards, tracking cases, hospitalizations, deaths and other metrics, are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • As of Nov. 15, indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to a maximum of 25 people, down from 250.
  • Health officials recommend people take extra precautions before, during and after traveling.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses are open in line with mandatory Phase 3 requirements.
  • The on-site sale, consumption and possession of alcohol in restaurants and other food and drink establishments is prohibited after 10 p.m.
  • Essential retail businesses must adhere to statewide guidelines for physical distancing, cleaning and face coverings, with violations newly classified as a misdemeanor.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A state dashboard showing COVID-19 metrics at K-12 schools is here.
  • An overview of the state's education-related resources is here. Information and guidance about school operations can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials say people should get tested if they have COVID-19 symptoms, had close contact with an infected person or have been asked or referred to get tested by their healthcare provider. Find testing sites and events here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for individuals and businesses are here.

West Virginia

What's the big picture?

  • West Virginia is progressing through its reopening plan while tightening restrictions on certain activities. It is using a color-coded system to determine the level of restrictions in each county.
  • An expanded mask mandate, effective Nov. 14, requires everyone over the age of 9 to wear a face covering in indoor public settings at all times, except for when eating and drinking or alone in a closed room.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing cases, deaths, positivity rate and other trends, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can operate under sector-specific guidelines listed here.
  • A November executive order postponed the start date for all youth winter sports teams and leagues to Jan. 11 and prohibits practices before then. Travel sports are prohibited in gold, orange and red counties.
  • Nursing home visitation protocols vary by county according to the color-coded system.
  • Indoor live music performances with in-person crowds are prohibited. Outdoor live music performances must restrict crowds to 25% of the venue's capacity or 250 individuals, whichever is less.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • The state uses a color-coded map system to determine the restrictions on schools and school activities in each county. Counties designated green, yellow or gold can hold classes in person or through a hybrid model, while remote-only learning is required for orange and red counties.

What should I know about testing?

  • Free COVID-19 testing is available to individuals regardless of symptoms, according to state officials. In-home saliva-based testing kits are also available to residents at no cost. Details about testing sites and locations are here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for businesses and workers are here. Information about mental health support is here.

The first version of this page was originally published on March 12. This is a developing story. We will continue to update as new information becomes available.

This is part of a series about coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin

South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia

West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.