A billboard in midtown Manhattan reads
Caption
A billboard in midtown Manhattan reads "Take Out To Help Out, last month in New York.

NPR is tracking coronavirus-related developments in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia so you can read up on your state's COVID-19 response and how it compares to others. This rundown focuses on statewide measures — local jurisdictions may vary.

Part of a series on coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Jump to a State: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, other states

Connecticut

What's the big picture?

  • Connecticut moved from Phase 3 of its reopening plan to a modified Phase 2.1, tightening restrictions on gatherings and certain businesses in response to an increase in COVID-19 cases.
  • Masks or cloth face coverings are required when a person is in public and cannot maintain six feet of distance from others, both indoors and outdoors. 
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard showing cases, deaths and hospitalizations is here

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A travel advisory requires visitors from certain states and countries to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. The list of locations is updated every Tuesday.  
  • Private, social and recreational gatherings at commercial venues are capped at 25 people indoors and 50 outdoors. Gatherings in private residences are limited to 10 people both indoors and outdoors. Indoor religious gatherings are limited to no more than 50% capacity, capped at 100 people.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Most businesses and services are open in accordance with sector-specific rules that limit capacity. Those sectors include amusement parks, state beaches, bowling alleys, construction, gyms, hair salons and barber shops, hotels, libraries, nail salons, manufacturing, museums and zoos, offices, retail, restaurants, schools, state campgrounds, spas, tattoo parlors and theaters. 
  • Under tightened restrictions effective Nov. 6, dine-in restaurants, entertainment and recreation venues and indoor and outdoor events at commercial venues must close by 10 p.m. 
  • Bars are closed statewide. Town beach access varies. Select DMV services can be completed online, and in-person services are available by appointment only.
  • All team sporting activities, excluding collegiate and professional, are paused until Jan. 19. 

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A dashboard showing confirmed cases among K-12 students and staff is here.
  • Individuals school districts' plans for the 2020-2021 academic year are available online.

What should I know about testing?

  • Anyone experiencing symptoms should get tested for COVID-19, according to state guidance. In certain situations, frontline workers, high-risk individuals and people who may have been exposed to the virus are encouraged to get tested even if they are asymptomatic. Find more information about COVID-19 testing here, and a testing site locator here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about state resources for individuals, businesses, workers, farmers and renters is available here.

Maine

What's the big picture?

  • Maine is in the fourth and final phase of its economic reopening plan, which it updated to tighten restrictions on social gatherings and certain businesses. 
  • An updated order effective Nov. 5 requires face masks to be worn in public regardless of whether social distancing is feasible. 
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard of cases, deaths, hospitalizations and recoveries by county is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Indoor gatherings are limited to a maximum of 50 people as of Nov. 4. Outdoor gatherings remain capped at 100 people.
  • Maine has a 14-day quarantine requirement for travelers arriving, with some exceptions. Under the Keep Maine Healthy plan, adults who test negative for COVID-19 no longer than 72 hours prior to their arrival in Maine do not have to quarantine for 14 days. As of Nov. 16, only travelers from Vermont and New Hampshire are exempt from the quarantine-or-test requirement. FAQs are here

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • All businesses can open in line with sector-specific health and safety requirements including occupancy limits. Non-seated indoor activities, such as exercise in gyms, are capped at 50 people, and retailers have an occupancy limit of 5 people per 1,000 square feet of shopping space.
  • From Nov. 20 through Dec. 6, all indoor and outdoor amusement venues, movie theaters, performing arts venues, casinos and businesses that provide seated food and drink service must close by 9 p.m.
  • The state postponed the reopening date for indoor service at bars, breweries and tasting rooms until further notice.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • The state's framework for reopening schools is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Anyone who feels they need a test for COVID-19, regardless of symptoms, can get tested without an order from their primary care physician, per state orders. An up-to-date list of the state's testing sites can be found here

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

Massachusetts

What's the big picture?

  • Massachusetts is in Phase 3 of its reopening plan, with designated lower-risk communities allowed to progress to Step 2 of Phase 3. Officials have enacted new measures including earlier businesses closures, revised gathering limits and a stay-at-home advisory, in response to rising cases and hospitalizations.
  • As of Nov. 6, all residents are advised to stay home between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. 
  • An updated order effective Nov. 6 requires individuals to wear masks or face coverings in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, regardless of whether social distancing is feasible. 
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which monitors cases, testing, hospitalizations, hospital capacity and deaths, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • All visitors entering Massachusetts from designated states, including returning residents, must complete a travel form and either provide a negative test result from up to 72 hours prior to arrival or quarantine for 14 days.
  • Gatherings at private residences are limited to 10 people indoors and 25 outdoors, and must disperse by 9:30 p.m.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • All Phase 1, 2 and 3 businesses can operate in line with mandatory safety standards and sector-specific protocols
  • As of Nov. 6, certain businesses and activities must close at 9:30 p.m. each night. Those include in-person dining, liquor stores, events, close contact personal services, gyms and theaters. 

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Reports on the number of confirmed cases in schools are available here.
  • State resources and guidance for school districts are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • People should get tested if they are experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms or have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, state officials say. The state's testing site locator is here.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

New Hampshire

What's the big picture?

  • New Hampshire is following a "Stay at Home 2.0" plan, which has been in effect since May and allows industries to gradually reopen in line with universal and sector-specific guidelines.
  • A statewide mask mandate requires individuals over the age of 5 to wear face coverings whenever they are in indoor or outdoor public spaces and unable to maintain six feet of distance from others. It took effect Nov. 20 and will last through Jan. 15. 
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks cases, tests, hospitalizations, deaths and recoveries, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Travelers, including returning residents, must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival if they are returning from outside the country, on a cruise ship or from states other than Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut or Rhode Island for non-essential purposes.
  • Travelers who are asymptomatic and have a negative PCR test result after seven days may shorten or end their quarantine.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Most businesses can operate in adherence with safety guidelines and capacity limits. Those include health and fitness facilities, theaters and performing arts venues, ski areas, dining and personal care services. Facilities and services for tourism and recreation can also operate in line with specific guidelines.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A dashboard showing COVID-19 cases associated with schools is here.
  • Copies of school districts' reopening plans are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Anyone who wants a test can get one, according to state health officials. Information about testing options and locations is available here.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

New Jersey

What's the big picture?

  • New Jersey has been in Stage 2 of its reopening plan since mid-June. Moderate-risk activities can operate with restrictions, and individuals are encouraged to work from home to the extent possible. Other mitigation measures have been announced as cases increase.
  • Face coverings are required in outdoor public spaces where social distancing is not possible, in indoor public spaces including public transportation, and in indoor commercial spaces such as office buildings where individuals are in prolonged proximity to others.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which shows cases and other trends, is here

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • The state has imposed various limits on different types of gatherings. For example, general gatherings are limited to 10 people indoors and 150 outdoors, while religious and political activities and indoor entertainment centers are limited to 25% of their capacity or 150 people, whichever is lower.
  • Visitors and residents traveling from any state or territory except for New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Delaware should self-quarantine for 14 days. There are exceptions for business and other essential travel. Travel FAQs are here.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Most low- and moderate-risk businesses and activities are open, with capacity limits and other restrictions. Those sectors include retail, personal care, indoor recreational facilities, gyms, performance venues and dining.
  • Municipalities can regulate the operating hours of non-essential businesses after 8 p.m.
  • Statewide, all restaurants, bars, lounges and clubs that serve food and drinks must close their indoor premises by 10 p.m. nightly and cannot open until at least 5 a.m. the next day. 
  • Bar seating in restaurants is prohibited. Adult day care centers remain closed.
  • All indoor youth and adult sports will be on a "full and complete" pause from Dec. 5 through Jan. 2, with exceptions for collegiate-level and professional teams. 

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Information about school reopenings for the 2020-2021 academic year is here, and plans vary by district.

What should I know about testing?

  • Anyone in the state can get tested, according to state health officials. Information about testing sites and requirements is available here.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

  • Information about benefits and assistance, from employment to housing to food to mental health, is available here.  
  • The state's COVID-19 Business Information Hub details reopening protocols and financial resources for businesses and workplaces. Help for job seekers is available here.

New York

What's the big picture?

  • Under the "New York Forward" plan, COVID-19 hotspots and surrounding areas are categorized into color-coded zones with tighter rules and restrictions based on the severity of transmission. You can search hot spot zones by address here
  • Individuals must wear face coverings when they are in public and within six feet of others, in settings where social distancing cannot be maintained and while in public transportation or for-hire vehicles. 
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard tracking positive tests by county is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Travelers coming from out of state can opt out of the mandatory 14-day quarantine if they get tested within three days of departure, quarantine upon arrival for three days and get a negative test result on the fourth day. Travelers from states that are contiguous with New York, as well as essential workers, are exempt from this requirement.
  • Details about travel guidelines are here
  • Social gatherings at private residences, both indoors and outdoors, are limited to no more than 10 people as of Nov. 13.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Statewide, essential businesses can operate under sector-specific guidelines.
  • All regions of the state have entered Phase 4 of reopening, under which sectors such as professional sports, certain arts and entertainment, malls and gyms can operate with restrictions. Specific industries were allowed to resume operations as regions entered Phases 1, 2 and 3.
  • Restrictions for cluster zones designated as red, orange and yellow are here. They dictate the level of restrictions on gatherings, houses of worship, non-essential businesses, dining and schools.
  • As of Nov. 13, bars, restaurants, gyms and State Liquor Authority-licensed establishments must close in-person service between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Information about positive cases associated with schools statewide is available here.
  • School guidance and resources are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Testing is available for free to all eligible New Yorkers as ordered by a health care provider or by calling the state's COVID-19 hotline, according to state officials. More information about testing is available here, and a testing site locator is here.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

Pennsylvania

What's the big picture?

  • Local officials can impose their own restrictions beyond the statewide reopening plan. As of Nov. 30, Allegheny, Delaware and Philadelphia counties are under additional guidelines.
  • A statewide order requires individuals to wear face coverings indoors and outdoors when outside of the home, including outdoors when unable to socially distance and indoors even if physically distant from non-household members.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard tracking daily cases and deaths is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Under a travel order effective Nov. 25, out-of-state visitors and returning residents over the age of 11 must have proof of a negative test result or else quarantine for 14 days upon arrival, with some exceptions.
  • Gathering limits for indoor and outdoor events were decreased on Nov. 23, and are determined by maximum occupancy calculators available here.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Most in-person businesses can operate at 75% occupancy unless otherwise noted, according to state officials. Restaurants are open at 50% capacity for indoor dining, gyms and spas are open at 50% capacity with appointments encouraged and personal care services are open at 50% capacity by appointment only.
  • On-premises alcohol consumption is only allowed as part of a meal, and selling alcohol for on-site consumption must end by 11 p.m.
  • As part of new mitigation efforts announced Nov. 23, teleworking is "mandatory unless impossible," and businesses must adhere to specific safety measures.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Guidance, recommendations and resources for schools are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • The state prioritizes testing people who are experiencing symptoms or have been in close contact with a confirmed case. More information about prioritized categories and testing locations is here.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

  • Information about financial, housing, unemployment, utilities, food, mental health and other resources is available here.

Rhode Island

What's the big picture?

  • Rhode Island has progressed to Phase 3 of its reopening plan, but entered a two-week pause on Nov. 30 in an effort to curb its growing number of cases and hospitalizations.  
  • As of Nov. 8, a stay-at-home advisory is in effect from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and from 10:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.
  • Under a state mandate, face coverings are required whenever individuals are close to others from outside of their household.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard tracking cases, deaths and hospitalizations is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Out-of-state visitors must fill out a screening form and certificate of compliance upon arrival. Travelers from certain states must quarantine for 14 days unless they have proof of a negative test result from within 72 hours prior to their arrival. Residents returning from certain states must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival unless they can provide proof of a negative test result from within 72 hours prior to their arrival. Details about travel and testing requirements are here.
  • From Nov. 30 to Dec. 13, social gatherings are limited to members of the same household. Adults who live alone can gather with one other household, capped at five people. 

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Under Phase 3 of the state's reopening plan, most businesses are open, and public events and assemblies are permitted, with limitations. Sector-specific guidance is available here.
  • Rhode Island's two-week pause from Nov. 30 to Dec. 13 limits in-person high school and social gatherings, and reduces capacity limits for indoor dining, retail and houses of worship. In-person colleges and universities, bar areas, recreational venues, indoor sports facilities and most offices and organized sports must close.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Information about COVID-19 testing for K-12 students and staff is here.
  • State guidance for outbreak response in Pre-K-12 schools is here.
  • Statewide and community-specific plans, resources and events are available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • The state health department recommends testing for people who have COVID-19 symptoms or have been in close contact with a confirmed positive, as well as travelers and individuals without symptoms. More information about where and how to get tested is here.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

Vermont

What's the big picture?

  • Vermont allowed certain businesses and services to resume operations under its phased reopening plan, but has since tightened restrictions on travel, gatherings, sports and restaurants.
  • Individuals are required to wear masks anytime they are in indoor or outdoor public spaces where they come into close contact with non-household members, and wherever it is not possible to maintain six feet of distance.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks metrics including cases, hospitalizations and deaths, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • An order effective Nov. 14 prohibits gatherings with people from other households, both indoors and outdoors. 
  • Residents returning to Vermont must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. If they do not have symptoms, they can get a PCR test on day seven and, with a negative test result, end quarantine early. Out-of-state visitors, except for essential workers, must meet the same quarantine or testing requirements.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Under the state's phased restart plan, most sectors can operate in accordance with specific restrictions.
  • Bars and social clubs are closed for in-person service as of Nov. 20. 
  • Restaurants can allow only one household per table, all guests must be seated and in-person service must stop by 10 p.m. All recreational sports are suspended.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Guidance and resources for Vermont schools and families is available here.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials recommend testing for people who have COVID-19 symptoms or have been in close contact with a confirmed case, have recently been at a social gathering with someone from another household or were referred by their healthcare provider for another reason. Details about where to get tested and what to expect are available online.

Where can I learn about relief and resources?

  • Information about resources for businesses, individuals, communities, small businesses, renters and homeowners is available here.

The first version of this page was originally published on March 12. This is a developing story. We will continue to update as new information becomes available.

This is part of a series about coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin

South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia

West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.