News organizations around the country, like NPR (pictured), have reevaluated their relationships with politicians and the White House in the past few years.
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News organizations around the country, like NPR (pictured), have reevaluated their relationships with politicians and the White House in the past few years.

After a contentious interaction between CNN's Jim Acosta and President Donald Trump during a briefing, Acosta's press pass was revoked. CNN later sued the White House to restore Acosta's credentials, spurring a back and forth that ended with the White House reinstating Acosta's credentials. CNN dropped the lawsuit, but, in its place, the White House issued some broad new rules for journalists to follow during press briefings.

 

The event opened up a conversation about the press at a transformative political time. Jonathan Peters, assistant professor of journalism at UGA, joined us to discuss this unprecedented lawsuit and the changing role of journalists.

 "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott speaks with Jonathan Peters.

 

"Journalists aim to uncover truths, sometimes uncomfortable truths about public policy," said Peters.

 

He also discussed waning trust in journalistic institutions by the general public. One way he said journalists could build trust with their listeners is through being transparent about their sources and story gathering techniques.

 

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