Bee Nguyen (m) works with Syrian refugees adjusting to life in the U.S. She plays a game of Jenga with Nawroz, 10, whose family arrived in Decatur, Georgia earlier this year. Watching on is Kurdeen Karim, who came to Georgia as a refugee in the late '90s.
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Bee Nguyen (m) works with Syrian refugees adjusting to life in the U.S. She plays a game of Jenga with Nawroz, 10, whose family arrived in Decatur, Georgia earlier this year. Watching on is Kurdeen Karim, who came to Georgia as a refugee in the late '90s.

More than 80 percent of children in Syria have been harmed by the unrest, according to a report by the United Nation’s children’s agency.  Some of the children who have escaped the violent conflict with their families have ended up in Georgia.  And we may have many more soon.  The U.S. plans to take in as many as 100,000 refugees by next year. On Second Thought producer Sean Powers visited one family who now calls Georgia home.