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Third Grade Social Studies Resources

CURRICULUM MAP

Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Penny and the KidVision VPK kids go to the Native Village to find out about the Seminole Indians. They learn about their clothing, colorful beads, interesting houses, and even learn some Seminole Indian words!
Skill: Describe early American Indian cultures and their development in North America. a. Locate the regions where American Indians settled in North America: Arctic, Northwest Southwest, Plains, Northeast, and Southeast. b. Compare and contrast how American Indians in each region used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter. c. Discuss how American Indians continue to contribute to American life (e.g., arts, literature).
Georgia Standard: SS3H11
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Students will discover the different ways of life for each tribe and the many ways the buffalo was used in day to day life. Students will also learn about a battle that erupted over the differing views of land ownership between Chief Sitting Bull and General Custer know as the Battle of Little Big Horn.
Skill: Describe early American Indian cultures and their development in North America. a. Locate the regions where American Indians settled in North America: Arctic, Northwest Southwest, Plains, Northeast, and Southeast. b. Compare and contrast how American Indians in each region used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter. c. Discuss how American Indians continue to contribute to American life (e.g., arts, literature).
Georgia Standard: SS3H1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes the five major regions of the United States: Northeast, Southeast, Middle West, West, and Southwest.
Skill: Describe early American Indian cultures and their development in North America. a. Locate the regions where American Indians settled in North America: Arctic, Northwest Southwest, Plains, Northeast, and Southeast. b. Compare and contrast how American Indians in each region used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter. c. Discuss how American Indians continue to contribute to American life (e.g., arts, literature).
Georgia Standard: SS3H1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes the culture, lifestyle, and history of three of the major Native American tribes of the Northeast: the Iroquois, the Pequot, and the Shawnee. The program discusses where the tribes were located, their history and livelihoods, and how the British settlers and the Revolutionary War impacted their lives and land. Native American clothing and culture are also described.
Skill: Describe early American Indian cultures and their development in North America. a. Locate the regions where American Indians settled in North America: Arctic, Northwest Southwest, Plains, Northeast, and Southeast. b. Compare and contrast how American Indians in each region used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter. c. Discuss how American Indians continue to contribute to American life (e.g., arts, literature).
Georgia Standard: SS3H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Chief Iron Eye and his family kept Salish traditions alive. In the Salish tradition, the "family unit" extends to the entire tribe, not just father, mother, and children.
Skill: Describe early American Indian cultures and their development in North America. a. Locate the regions where American Indians settled in North America: Arctic, Northwest Southwest, Plains, Northeast, and Southeast. b. Compare and contrast how American Indians in each region used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter. c. Discuss how American Indians continue to contribute to American life (e.g., arts, literature).
Georgia Standard: SS3H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
In this interactive resource featuring audio, images, and text adapted from Raven Radio/KCAW, meet Richard Glenn, an Alaska Native geologist. Glenn explains that he is first an Iñupiaq Eskimo and whale hunter. He studied Western science as a way to inform himself and his people about how the oil companies perceived the resources of the North Slope. He then suggests that Alaska Native ways of knowing and Western science can be likened to two flashlights shining down the same path.
Skill: Describe early American Indian cultures and their development in North America. a. Locate the regions where American Indians settled in North America: Arctic, Northwest Southwest, Plains, Northeast, and Southeast. b. Compare and contrast how American Indians in each region used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter. c. Discuss how American Indians continue to contribute to American life (e.g., arts, literature).
Georgia Standard: SS3H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
English explorer Henry Hudson was born at the height of the age of exploration in Europe, as navigators hunted for new routes to Asia. Hudson's multiple voyages to the arctic in search of a Northwest passage eventually set the stage for British colonial dominance in North America.
Skill: Describe European exploration in North America. a. Describe the reasons for and obstacles to the exploration of North America. b. Describe the accomplishments of: John Cabot (England), Vasco Núñez de Balboa (Spain), Hernando de Soto (Spain), Christopher Columbus (Spain), Henry Hudson (The Netherlands), and Jacques Cartier (France). c. Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between European explorers and American Indians.
Georgia Standard: SS3H2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Brilliant explorer? Or violent conqueror? Almost no other explorer inspires as much controversy as Christopher Columbus. Find more about this Italian explorer's historic journey to the Caribbean in 1492.
Skill: Describe European exploration in North America. a. Describe the reasons for and obstacles to the exploration of North America. b. Describe the accomplishments of: John Cabot (England), Vasco Núñez de Balboa (Spain), Hernando de Soto (Spain), Christopher Columbus (Spain), Henry Hudson (The Netherlands), and Jacques Cartier (France). c. Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between European explorers and American Indians.
Georgia Standard: SS3H2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Five hundred years after the viking exploration of North America, Italian explorer John Cabot became the first known European to reach its mainland. Honing his sailing skills in the Meditteranean, Cabot followed in Columbus's footsteps to explore the Atlantic in search of a route to Asia.
Skill: Describe European exploration in North America. a. Describe the reasons for and obstacles to the exploration of North America. b. Describe the accomplishments of: John Cabot (England), Vasco Núñez de Balboa (Spain), Hernando de Soto (Spain), Christopher Columbus (Spain), Henry Hudson (The Netherlands), and Jacques Cartier (France). c. Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between European explorers and American Indians.
Georgia Standard: SS3H2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Experience the Mayflower’s arrival in November 1620 and learn about the Pilgrims’ first winter, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Pilgrims. With passengers and crew weakened by the voyage and weeks exploring Cape Cod, the Mayflower anchored in Plymouth harbor in late December 1620. After ferrying supplies to land, the Pilgrims began building a common house for shelter and to store their goods. The weather worsened, and exposure and infections took their toll. By the spring of 1621, about half of the Mayflower’s passengers and crew had died.
Skill: Explain the factors that shaped British Colonial America. a. Identify key reasons why the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies were founded (religious freedom and profit). b. Compare and contrast colonial life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies (education, economy, and religion). c. Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of various people: large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, children, indentured servants, slaves, and American Indians.
Describe how physical systems affect human systems. a. Explain why American Indian groups occupied the areas they did (SS3H1a), with emphasis on why some developed permanent villages and others did not. b. Describe how the early explorers (SS3H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled. c. Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities.
Georgia Standard: SS3H3, SS3G3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Discover what led Massasoit, the leader of one Wampanoag village, to form an alliance with the Plymouth colony and learn about the harvest feast now called the "First Thanksgiving," in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Pilgrims. In March 1621, a Native man named Samoset entered Plymouth and greeted the Pilgrims in English. Six
Skill: Explain the factors that shaped British Colonial America. a. Identify key reasons why the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies were founded (religious freedom and profit). b. Compare and contrast colonial life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies (education, economy, and religion). c. Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of various people: large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, children, indentured servants, slaves, and American Indians.
Georgia Standard: SS3H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
What some people refer to as Oglethorpe's Folly, others think is a valuable outpost for the British crown. Only time will let us know the answer about what will become of Georgia. Turn on the television, and let's watch the Colonial Evening News. Imagine a television newscast from Savannah in 1734. Anchorman Jonathan Patrick from Williamsburg gives the overseas reports and colonial news from Philadelphia before introducing the feature story: the Georgia colony.
Skill: Explain the factors that shaped British Colonial America. a. Identify key reasons why the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies were founded (religious freedom and profit). b. Compare and contrast colonial life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies (education, economy, and religion). c. Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of various people: large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, children, indentured servants, slaves, and American Indians.
Describe how physical systems affect human systems. a. Explain why American Indian groups occupied the areas they did (SS3H1a), with emphasis on why some developed permanent villages and others did not. b. Describe how the early explorers (SS3H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled. c. Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities.
Georgia Standard: SS3H3, SS3G3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes the founding of the middle colonies beginning in 1609 when Henry Hudson was hired by the Dutch to find a trade route to Asia, but instead found an area which is now New York City. The program describes the expansion of the middle colonies to include Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. It also explains how the middle colonies were an attractive area to settle because of fertile soils, river systems, and job opportunities.
Skill: Explain the factors that shaped British Colonial America. a. Identify key reasons why the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies were founded (religious freedom and profit). b. Compare and contrast colonial life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies (education, economy, and religion). c. Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of various people: large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, children, indentured servants, slaves, and American Indians.
Describe how physical systems affect human systems. a. Explain why American Indian groups occupied the areas they did (SS3H1a), with emphasis on why some developed permanent villages and others did not. b. Describe how the early explorers (SS3H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled. c. Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities.
Georgia Standard: SS3H3, SS3G3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes the founding of the southern colonies beginning in 1607 with Jamestown. The program explores the difficulties experienced by European colonists settling in the area, examines how the geography of the region led to the development and distribution of cash crops, and reveals the southern colonies' reliance on indentured servants and enslaved people from Africa.
Skill: Explain the factors that shaped British Colonial America. a. Identify key reasons why the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies were founded (religious freedom and profit). b. Compare and contrast colonial life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies (education, economy, and religion). c. Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of various people: large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, children, indentured servants, slaves, and American Indians.
Describe how physical systems affect human systems. a. Explain why American Indian groups occupied the areas they did (SS3H1a), with emphasis on why some developed permanent villages and others did not. b. Describe how the early explorers (SS3H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled. c. Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities.
Georgia Standard: SS3H3, SS3G3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Pop band HelloGoodbye sings about the 50 States of America. All 50 states are mentioned in one song that focuses on the people, culture, or geography of each region; use the lesson plan and worksheet to bring this video into your classroom today!
Skill: Locate major topographical features on a physical map of the United States. a. Locate major rivers of the United States of America: Mississippi, Ohio, Rio Grande, Colorado, Hudson, and St. Lawrence. b. Locate major mountain ranges of the United States of America: Appalachian, Rocky.
Georgia Standard: SS3G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes the major geographical regions of the North American continent including the Rocky Mountains, central plains, Appalachian Mountains, Great Lakes, and Mississippi River.
Skill: Locate major topographical features on a physical map of the United States. a. Locate major rivers of the United States of America: Mississippi, Ohio, Rio Grande, Colorado, Hudson, and St. Lawrence. b. Locate major mountain ranges of the United States of America: Appalachian, Rocky.
Georgia Standard: SS3G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Connect drawings to maps and models to globes as students see their community from above and begin to understand scale, relative position, and direction. Packed with definitions for terms like symbol, compass rose, cardinal directions, and legend, the program depicts students making a variety of maps and finding locations on a simple grid map.
Skill: Locate and describe the equator, prime meridian, and lines of latitude and longitude on a globe.
Georgia Standard: SS3G2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
In this episode of Things Explained, we discuss the role and responsibilities of Georgia's governor and how the position compares to that of the U.S. president. We also highlight some political dynamics of the state and some of Georgia's most famous governors.
Skill: Describe the elements of representative democracy/republic in the United States. a. Describe the three branches of national government: executive (president), legislative (Congress), and judicial (Supreme Court of the United States). b. Describe the three branches of state government: executive (governor), legislative (Georgia General Assembly), and judicial (Supreme Court of Georgia). c. State the main responsibility of each branch: executive (enforcing laws), legislative (making laws), judicial (determining if laws are fair).
Georgia Standard: SS3CG1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive Lesson
In this interactive lesson supporting literacy skills, students learn about the three branches of the United States government. Students develop their literacy skills as they explore a social studies focus on the powers that the Constitution assigns to each branch—legislative, executive, and judicial—and how the three branches work together. During this process, they read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through videos and interactive activities.
Skill: Describe the elements of representative democracy/republic in the United States. a. Describe the three branches of national government: executive (president), legislative (Congress), and judicial (Supreme Court of the United States). b. Describe the three branches of state government: executive (governor), legislative (Georgia General Assembly), and judicial (Supreme Court of Georgia). c. State the main responsibility of each branch: executive (enforcing laws), legislative (making laws), judicial (determining if laws are fair).
Georgia Standard: SS3CG1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
This program explores the functions of the legislative branch of the U.S. Government: legislative checks and balances, the power to impeach, and the lawmaking process. It also explains the origins of the two-house system and the structure of the Senate and House of Representatives.
Skill: Describe the elements of representative democracy/republic in the United States. a. Describe the three branches of national government: executive (president), legislative (Congress), and judicial (Supreme Court of the United States). b. Describe the three branches of state government: executive (governor), legislative (Georgia General Assembly), and judicial (Supreme Court of Georgia). c. State the main responsibility of each branch: executive (enforcing laws), legislative (making laws), judicial (determining if laws are fair).
Georgia Standard: SS3CG1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Investigates the legislative, executive, and judicial branches that make up the government of the United States. The program explores the functions and structure of each branch as well as the series of checks and balances that exist to maintain a balance of power among them.
Skill: Describe the elements of representative democracy/republic in the United States. a. Describe the three branches of national government: executive (president), legislative (Congress), and judicial (Supreme Court of the United States). b. Describe the three branches of state government: executive (governor), legislative (Georgia General Assembly), and judicial (Supreme Court of Georgia). c. State the main responsibility of each branch: executive (enforcing laws), legislative (making laws), judicial (determining if laws are fair).
Georgia Standard: SS3CG1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Abby Brown loves to help kids have fun while learning! In this segment, Abby teaches kids about what it means to be a citizen in their community. We all have a civic duty, or responsibility to take care of each other.
Skill: Explain the importance of Americans sharing certain central democratic beliefs and principles, both personal and civic. a. Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good. b. Explain the necessity of obeying reasonable laws/rules voluntarily, and explain why it is important for citizens in a democratic society to participate in public (civic) life (staying informed, voting, volunteering, and communicating with public officials).
Georgia Standard: SS3CG2
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Productive resources are all resources used to make goods and services in an economy. Three main types of productive resources exist. Natural resources are resources taken from Earth and nature. These include soil, lumber, water, oil, and plants such as cotton and wheat. Capital resources are physical goods made by humans that are used to produce other goods and services. Computers and machinery are examples of capital resources.
Human resources are the third type of productive resources. Human resources include all the labor, knowledge, skills, and abilities that people contribute to production. Entrepreneurship is a special kind of human resource in which a person comes up with the idea for a business and takes a risk to start it. Producers combine productive resources to make goods and services. For example, a producer may manufacture denim jeans. Jeans are made of cotton fabric, which comes from a natural resource. Jeans are sewn together using machines in a factory. These are capital resources. The skill and efforts of the worker who makes the jeans are human resources.
Skill: Define and give examples of the four types of productive resources. a. Natural (land) b. Human (labor) c. Capital (capital goods) d. Entrepreneurship (risk-taking and combining natural, human, and capital resources in an
attempt to make a profit)
Georgia Standard: SS3E1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Public services are services that are paid for by the government. However, people are required to pay a share of the cost to the government. This share is called taxes.
Skill: Explain that governments provide certain types of goods and services in a market economy (schools, libraries, roads, police/fire protection, and military) and pay for these through taxes.
Georgia Standard: SS3E2
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Showcases the numerous ways in which government impacts daily life, including time-keeping, water supply, food distribution and pasteurization, weather forecasting, traffic laws, the public school system, park service, law enforcement, and more.
Skill: Explain that governments provide certain types of goods and services in a market economy (schools, libraries, roads, police/fire protection, and military) and pay for these through taxes.
Georgia Standard: SS3E2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Kids read and discover more about money! In this feature, kids design, create and name their own currency. They also get to decide what their currency is worth!
Skill: Give examples of interdependence and trade and explain the benefits of voluntary exchange. a. Describe the interdependence of consumers and producers. b. Describe how goods and services are allocated by price in the marketplace. c. Explain that some goods are made locally, some elsewhere in the country, and some in other countries. d. Explain that most countries create their own currency for use as money.
Georgia Standard: SS3E3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Bianca finds a gold coin on the sidewalk and thinks that she's rich. When she takes her coin to an expert to find out how much it's worth, she learns that the coin is only worth a dollar. She also learns that in the past currency was either made of something precious or represented a particular amount of silver or gold, but today, money is symbolic and it is worth an agreed-upon exchange value.
Skill: Give examples of interdependence and trade and explain the benefits of voluntary exchange. a. Describe the interdependence of consumers and producers. b. Describe how goods and services are allocated by price in the marketplace. c. Explain that some goods are made locally, some elsewhere in the country, and some in other countries. d. Explain that most countries create their own currency for use as money.
Georgia Standard: SS3E3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Techbook
Your group has been given the task to build a small robot. You must purchase all of the needed materials, and you must plan this into your budget. The goal is for you to have money left over. You will do online research to see how much the parts for your robot will cost. Use the sheet attached to the right to plan and keep track of your spending. Each group will start with $250, and you must keep track of all the materials you buy.
Skill: Explain the concept of opportunity cost as it relates to making a saving or spending choice.
Georgia Standard: SS3E4