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Fourth Grade Social Studies Resources

 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Collection: videos, images, documents, interactive resources
This collection is intended for 6-12 but has many useful components: videos, documents, interactive resources, documents, and images that could easily be adapted for 4th graders from George Washington’s Mount Vernon highlighting his role as a leader during the American Revolution. See the progress of the war through the actions and decisions of General George Washington, such as direct confrontation, military strategy, disease prevention, and spy techniques.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution. 
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video Series
Patrick Henry's impassioned plea at the Second Virginia Convention in 1775, "Give me liberty or give me death," defined the American Revolution. This one-hour documentary-drama captures this seminal moment in American history by balancing experts' commentary on the events preceding the Second Virginia Convention with dramatic re-enactments of the historic moments that followed.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with support materials
At the height of the Age of Enlightenment, Benjamin Franklin accomplished great works in countless fields, including science, politics, and media, becoming one of America’s most prolific Founding Fathers. Through two primary source activities and a short video, understand how Franklin embodied Enlightenment values, and used his talent in writing and printing to have his opinions heard and help shape the world.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Primary source images
This media gallery contains resources on Benjamin Franklin when he served as Ambassador to France from 1776-1785.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Thomas Jefferson influenced the landscape of America, both politically and geographically. Discover more about the third president of the U.S. and why he's such a big deal.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
As far as Presidents go, none set more precedents than George Washington. From his leadership of the Continental Army, to his bold commitment to founding a strong nation, take a quick look back at the legacy of our very first leader
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Timeline
"The War that Made America" brings to life a vastly important time in American history, when events set forces in motion that would culminate in the American Revolution.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Inquiry Kit with questions
This inquiry kit features Library of Congress sources focused on the protests that led to the American Revolution.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
John Adams had his hands full when he took over the presidency from George Washington. Find out how he dealt with the feuding political parties and attacks on U.S. merchants from France and Britain. Being the leader of a young nation isn?t as easy as you might think.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Reports that the Tea Act lowered the price of tea, and states that its purpose was to bailout the East India Company. The segment also busts other myths of the Boston Tea Party, and explains that those who threw the tea off the ships were wearing disguises not intentionally meant to give them the appearance of American Indians.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Tired of British control, colonists take matters into their own hands to gain their independence.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution. 
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Showcases some of the major battles, people, groups, and events of the American Revolution, and focuses primarily on the perspective of the 13 Colonies and the United States. The program discusses the events leading to the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the importance of, and the actions of, the First and Second Continental Congress, the major documents and treaties of the American Revolution, and the conclusion of the war. The program also contains a three-question video quiz for each segment.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Outlines the events surrounding the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation, and discusses the limitations and advantages of the Articles of Confederation.
Skill: Explain the causes, events, and results of the American Revolution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
James Madison's legacy includes political triumphs such as introducing the Bill of Rights. It also includes failures such as the War of 1812 and Washington D.C. getting burned to the ground. Find out more about the roller coaster ride that was Madison's presidency.
Skill: Analyze the challenges faced by the framers of the Constitution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
This video segment adapted from Africans in America explores the division among the state delegates to the Constitutional Convention about the issue of slavery. Although some states had already begun to abolish slavery, other states held that the right to own slaves should remain protected by the federal government. What resulted was a debate about the right to personal liberty and the right to own property, which for many included slaves.
Skill: Analyze the challenges faced by the framers of the Constitution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson with supporting documents and video
In this blended lesson supporting literacy skills, students learn about the debate over slavery at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. Students develop their literacy skills as they explore a social studies focus on the changing perception of slavery in the new United States and the ways in which the debate over slavery affected the content of the Constitution. During this process, they read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through videos and interactive activities.
Skill: Analyze the challenges faced by the framers of the Constitution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H2
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Emphasizes the fragility of the federal government of the United States during its early years, and reveals that George Washington warned against the bickering and conflicts of political parties. The segment outlines the basic beliefs of the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans, and summarizes the presidential campaign of 1800.
Skill: Analyze the challenges faced by the framers of the Constitution.
Georgia Standard: SS4H2
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with support materials
This lesson plan, to be used with the program The War of 1812, has students explore what Nationalism means as well as the symbolic features of a nation such as a national anthem and a flag. Students will learn the story of Francis Scott Key and create their own anthems.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson with supporting documents
In this interactive lesson supporting literacy skills, students are introduced to the Cherokees' struggle to remain on their land in the early 1800s. Students develop their literacy skills as they explore a social studies focus on the assimilation strategy of the Cherokee Nation and its eventual impact on their fate. During this process, they read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through videos and interactive activities.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video and support materials
Although Native tribes had occupied the Great Plains for centuries, in 1803, President Jefferson doubled the size of the U.S. by purchasing 828,000 acres claimed by France west of the Mississippi. Jefferson sent explorers Lewis and Clark on a "voyage of discovery" to map routes through the territory and see what it had to offer. Reports from the Lewis and Clark expedition inspired many to venture there, including explorers Pike, Long, and Fremont, and created routes followed for centuries after.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Primary source image
After the purchase of the Louisiana Territory in 1803, settlers looking for land in the eastern US began moving westward into the prairies and beyond. The flat plains in the center of the continent proved excellent land for grazing and farming. Over time, the image of mid-western topography became associated with pioneering spirit and the American desire for expansion. Even now, when Americans think of westward expansion, they picture the great plains.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Collection
Focusing on state curricula for elementary school students, this collection of educational materials features video segments from Idaho Public Television’s Lewis and Clark: Moments in Time series, which is based on excerpts from the journals of Lewis and Clark.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with support materials
This lesson plan, to be used with the program The War of 1812, will share with students the story of First Lady Dolley Madison and the burning of the White House during the war. Notions of duty, symbolism, and nationalism will be discussed and related to the students' lives.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Teaches about the forced removal of the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Muscogee, Seminole, Chickasaw, and Choctaw) from the Southeastern United States by President Andrew Jackson, and focuses on the experiences of the Cherokee during the removal. The program outlines the legal battles the Cherokee Nation waged in order to defend their rights, and teaches how and why Andrew Jackson and Georgia brought about the Trail of Tears.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Provides context for the War of 1812 by highlighting the foreign-policy struggles of the Thomas Jefferson administration, including the Chesapeake Affair, Embargo Act, and impressment. The segment discusses the range of opinions in the United States on whether or not a conflict with Great Britain should have been avoided or embraced, and briefly summarizes the role of Native Americans on the growing tensions between the US and Great Britain.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes some of the effects of the Louisiana Purchase. It doubled the size of the country and gave Americans access to more land and natural resources. It also gave the United States control of the Mississippi River and the Port of New Orleans, increasing trade and commerce.
Skill: Explain westward expansion in America.
Georgia Standard: SS4H3
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson plan with supporting video and documents
After escaping from slavery in 1838, Frederick Douglass went on to become a prominent writer, orator, and abolitionist in the years leading up to the Civil War. Through two primary source activities and a short video, understand how Douglass stood firm in his beliefs and rose to prominence, and explore the importance of literacy in his life.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson plan with supporting video and documents
Students will learn about women’s rights activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton by focusing on her strengths and challenges as an activist and founder of the National Woman Suffrage Association. After watching a short video, examining a photo of Stanton with Susan B. Anthony, and reading excerpts of the Declaration of Sentiments, students will assess the lessons they have learned about organizing people to make change.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Collection
The first wave of the women's feminist movement started in the 19th and early 20th century with leaders such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton fighting for legal rights for women such as the ability to vote and own property. The second wave of the women's movement, led by women such as Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem, occurred in the 1960s and 70s and attempted to combat further social and political inequalities. This collection includes resources to support teaching both waves of the women's movement.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Attempts to communicate the gravity of the life of Frederick Douglass, and chronicles the long list of Douglass's accomplishments that include learning to read and write, escaping slavery, working in shipyards, giving speeches around the world, writing timeless and bestselling autobiographies, starting a newspaper, holding government offices, championing the abolitionist and women's rights movements, personally advising Abraham Lincoln, and many others.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Images
This collections is intended to be used 6-12 but could easily be used with fourth graders. View images featuring Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other suffragists. These early feminists and fast friends dedicated to advancing the rights of all women in the 19th century. Through their efforts in New York State, the Married Women’s Property Law was amended in 1860 to allow women the right to own property, a business, and to manage their own income. Anthony and Stanton also fought for the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which in 1865 abolished slavery in the United States. They worked to advance marriage and divorce reform, and to expand educational opportunities for women.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson plan with supporting video and documents
In this lesson, students will learn about Harriet Tubman’s extraordinary courage in the face of enormous risks. After watching a biographical video, they will examine a photograph of Tubman and read a letter.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson plan with supporting video and documents
An abolitionist and feminist during the nineteenth century, Sojourner Truth demanded not less discrimination, but no discrimination. Truth escaped enslavement and, despite being unable to read or write, rose to be a leader in the fight for equality and fair treatment for both women and African Americans. Through two primary source activities and a short biographical video, students will understand the remarkable career of this persevering woman who lived up to her self-chosen name.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Reveals which states women were allowed to vote in before 1920 when the 19th amendment was ratified. In 1872, Susan B. Anthony and fourteen other women attempted to vote in an election.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Susan B. Anthony, an advocate for women's writes, was arrested when she attempted to vote during an election.
Skill: Examine the main ideas of the abolitionist and suffrage movements.
Georgia Standard: SS4H4
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video and link to an additional collection 
The Emancipation Proclamation is issued. It doesn’t solve the problem of slavery, only freeing slaves in the states that seceded.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Outlines some of the main events and laws that heightened tensions in the United States and ultimately led to the American Civil War, and focuses on The Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's Rebellion, Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," the Kansas-Nebraska Act, Scott v. Sandford, John Brown's raid of Harpers Ferry, and the election of Abraham Lincoln. The program teaches how critical moments furthered tensions between free states and slave states, and reveals how slavery intensified and fostered economic, geographic, cultural, and political divisions in the United States.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
In this video adapted from American Experience: “The Abolitionists,” featuring historical reenactments, learn about the impact of novelist Harriet Beecher Stowe on the abolitionist movement. Stowe was an author whose commitment to the abolitionist cause was strengthened after passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850. She responded with the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, an immediate best seller that was credited with “putting a human face on slavery” and ultimately helping launch the Civil War.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with support materials
Harriet Beecher Stowe used the emotional power of words to express her conscious belief in racial equality. She wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin to point out the atrocities of slavery, an issue that divided the nation and eventually led to the start of the Civil War. Throughout her life, she continued writing against injustice wherever she saw it. Through two primary source activities and a short biographical video, students will examine the content and impact of Stowe’s Uncle Tom's Cabin, one of the most influential books in American history.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Collection of video excerpts
In 1859 John Brown seized a federal armory at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, but failed to incite a revolution. Authorities found a link between Brown and Frederick Douglass. Learn more with this excerpt from American Experience: "The Abolitionists."
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
In October 1859, John Brown and a band of 21 men tried to raid the armory at Harpers Ferry. They thought their bold act would inspire slaves to rise up against their masters. Brown's raid failed, but his trial succeeded in bringing attention to the abolitionist cause. Video from, American Experience: "Abolitionists."
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with support materials
By the time Lincoln arrives in Washington, most of the southern states have left the union, forming the Confederate States of America with another Kentucky native, Jefferson Davis, as president. Six weeks into Lincoln’s term, the Civil War begins at Fort Sumter, SC.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Collection with short videos and thinking questions
April 2014 marked the 150th anniversary of General William T. Sherman’s first foray into Georgia. He and his army stayed for 37 weeks. Georgia Public Broadcasting, in partnership with the Atlanta History Center, observed that significant date by premiering the first of a 37 part series that brought to life Sherman’s devastating journey through Georgia. Each of the 90 second segments brought to life what has happening that same week 150 years earlier.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
In this short history of the Civil War, we're exposed to the months leading up to November 1863, when Abraham Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address. This synopsis paints a gritty picture of the war, and of Lincoln's inspiring words that redefined the Union's fight as a battle for human equality. Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Watch Ken Burns recite the Gettysburg Address as part of his challenge to all Americans to Learn the Address.
Skill: Explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the Civil War.
Georgia Standard: SS4H5
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Activity
Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.
Skill: Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
Georgia Standard: SS4H6
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
States that the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution calls for the abolition of slavery, and includes a brief summary of the history of slavery in the United States. The segment also provides a video quiz that is based on the content of the segment.
Skill: Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
Georgia Standard: SS4H6
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Interprets the meaning of the 14th Amendment, and explains that the 14th Amendment is the longest amendment to the United States Constitution. The segment discusses how the 14th Amendment clarifies and establishes citizenship, equal protection, and due process, and provides a video quiz that is based on the content of the segment.
Skill: Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
Georgia Standard: SS4H6
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Teaches that the 15th Amendment protects the voting rights of all United States citizens, and provides a video quiz that is based on the content of the segment.
Skill: Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
Georgia Standard: SS4H6
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
The flat, low-lying Atlantic Coastal Plain extends through parts of Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and all of Long Island Sound. The ancient peaks of the Appalachian Mountains stretch across all states of the region but Delaware, while the Adirondacks rise above northern New York State.
Skill: Locate important physical and man-made features in the United States.
Georgia Standard: SS4G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Examines the history of the Great Plains region of the United States. This segment highlights the changes in the landscape from early Native American tribes and bison that inhabited the land, to the expeditions of various explorers. The segment continues to explore the evolution of the Great Plains region into the agricultural powerhouse it is today.
Skill: Locate important physical and man-made features in the United States.
Georgia Standard: SS4G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Highlights the Great Plains region and explores its unique geographic features, landmarks, climate, and cities. The segment also explores agricultural and natural resources produced in the Great Plains region.
Skill: Locate important physical and man-made features in the United States.
Georgia Standard: SS4G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes the major geographical regions of the North American continent including the Rocky Mountains, central plains, Appalachian Mountains, Great Lakes, and Mississippi River.
Skill: Locate important physical and man-made features in the United States.
Georgia Standard: SS4G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Describes topography as the natural and man-made physical features of a location.
Skill: Locate important physical and man-made features in the United States.
Georgia Standard: SS4G1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Profiles Michael A. Brown, Esq., a celebrated attorney from Baltimore, Maryland, who shares the ways in which the right to free speech is protected by the Constitution.
Skill: Explain the importance of freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
Georgia Standard: SS4CG2
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Explains the creation of constitutional amendments and the Bill of Rights. Some of the authors of the Constitution wanted the document to focus more on individual rights. Ten amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, were proposed and added to the Constitution to limit government control over individual rights. The First Amendment provides freedom of religion, freedom of the press, freedom of speech, and the right to assemble. This means that citizens are allowed to practice any or no religion, publish ideas and information, express opinions, and hold gatherings, even if these ideas and gatherings are in opposition to the government.
Skill: Explain the importance of freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
Georgia Standard: SS4CG2
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Explains the different forms of government and why a government exists. Different forms of government include a dictatorship, authoritarianism, totalitarianism, a presidential democracy, and a parliamentary system.
Skill: Describe the meaning of: a. Natural rights as found in the Declaration of Independence (the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness) b. “We the People” from the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution as a reflection of consent of
the governed or popular sovereignty c. The federal system of government in the U.S. (federal powers, state powers, and shared powers) d. Representative democracy/republic
Georgia Standard: SS4CG1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Explore the history of democracy and the creation of American government. Students learn about the foundations of democracy and the creation of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.
Skill: Describe the meaning of: a. Natural rights as found in the Declaration of Independence (the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness) b. “We the People” from the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution as a reflection of consent of
the governed or popular sovereignty c. The federal system of government in the U.S. (federal powers, state powers, and shared powers) d. Representative democracy/republic
Georgia Standard: SS4CG1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
This video segment describes how our system of federalism works to maintain state and individual liberties while ensuring that the federal government is strong enough to meet the country's needs. It explains the national government's responsibilities in domestic and foreign policy, as well as how taxation and internal order work.
Skill: Describe the meaning of: a. Natural rights as found in the Declaration of Independence (the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness) b. “We the People” from the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution as a reflection of consent of
the governed or popular sovereignty c. The federal system of government in the U.S. (federal powers, state powers, and shared powers) d. Representative democracy/republic
Georgia Standard: SS4CG1
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Activity
Explore why the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution and its enduring impact on defining our rights. In this interactive lesson from WGBH, students develop a written argument in response to the question “How does the Bill of Rights establish and continue to define the rights we have as Americans?” They gather evidence from videos featuring historian Ben Weber and from primary source documents. This resource is part of the Writing in U.S. History collection, the Calderwood Writing Course: U.S. History.
Skill: Describe the structure of government and the Bill of Rights.
Georgia Standard: SS4CG3
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
People work to earn money to satisfy their basic needs and wants. Help students understand the two, as well as the difference between goods and services. Explore a variety of jobs, including production and service workers, and introduce students to banks and the concept of saving money.
Skill: Use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.
Georgia Standard: SS4E1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
The concept of scarcity is explained. Although this specific example does not match 4th grade content, the video could be useful to help students apply what they know about scarcity to historical content/events. During the 1600s, beaver fur supply became scarce. The Dutch claimed the New Netherland territory to expand the fur trade, and the scarcity of beaver fur motivated Dutch traders to trade with local Native American tribes.
Skill: Use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.
Georgia Standard: SS4E1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Examines the invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitney and considers how the invention changed the Southern economy.
Skill: Use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.
Georgia Standard: SS4E1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Image
Photograph of a cotton yard at the Wellington Cotton Gin. An accompanying note states that Lonzo Cartwright was the cotton gin manager.
Skill: Use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events.
Georgia Standard: SS4E1
 
Source: Discovery Education (Login required. Reference your school’s directions for accessing from home.)
Resource Type: Video
Introduce late elementary students to concepts in personal finance. Students will learn about earning power, consider needs versus wants, understand what it means to save for a goal, and take a closer look at what banking is all about.
Skill: Identify the elements of a personal budget (income, expenditures, and saving) and explain why personal spending and saving decisions are important.
Georgia Standard: SS4E2