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Fourth Grade Mathematics Resources

 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson Plan
In this lesson, students use line segments, angles, and parallel and perpendicular lines in order to create a one point perspective drawing.
Skill: Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.G.1
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Exhibit your knowledge of 2D shapes and search for similar characteristics. This interactive diagram focuses on sorting polygons by common properties and then you select the correct label for each section of the Venn Diagram.
Skill: Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.G.2
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video and Practice
When comparing, it's often helpful to start by using letters to represent numbers. This video will walk you through two examples.
Skill: Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.MD.3
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Students apply computer programming concepts as they experiment and discover how to draw squares, triangles, and other geometric shapes using pen-drawing commands. Enhances STEM learning outcomes as they trace complex patterns to collect all of the orbs. Estimated time: 20 min. More free coding activities at www.tynker.com/hour-of-code.
Skill: Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement:
a. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a “one degree angle,” and can be used to measure angles.
b. An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure of n degrees.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.MD.5
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Students apply geometry concepts to create patterns and shapes while they learn computer programming. Enhances STEM learning outcomes as they program their spaceship to race through the galaxy. Estimated time: 40 min. More free coding activities at www.tynker.com/hour-of-code.
Skill: Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement:
a. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a “one degree angle,” and can be used to measure angles.
b. An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure of n degrees.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.MD.5
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson Plan
Students are introduced to angles as turns, learn their definitions, and how to name them. They are also introduced to the notion of the measure of an angle, learning the number of degrees in a circle, a half circle, and a quarter circle, and the terms right, straight, acute, and obtuse. This CYBERCHASE activity is motivated by an episode in which the CyberSquad has to navigate with angles and distances to locate a treasure chest.
Skill: Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.MD.5
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video and Practice
You're becoming a pro at rounding whole numbers. Here's another example exercise. Can you do it first before watching the end of the video?
Skill: Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NBT.3
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Model solutions to the fraction problems given by stacking and connecting your virtual manipulatives. This interactive exercise touches on comparing, simplifying, and basic operations with fractions using virtual Cuisenaire® Rods.
Skill: Explain why two or more fractions are equivalent byusing visual fraction models. Focus attention on how the number and size of the parts differ even though the fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.1
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Play a fast-paced video game that involves finding rational numbers on the number line. This game from Math Snacks focuses on using what you know about positive and negative numbers and fractions to place them correctly on the variable number line and retrieve pearls.
Skill: Explain why two or more fractions are equivalent byusing visual fraction models. Focus attention on how the number and size of the parts differ even though the fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.1
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with Activity
This video from Cyberchase features Bianca working on her aunt and uncle’s farm. Bianca is excited because she’s getting a new pet. She uses equivalent fractions to combine different lengths of wood to build a roof on a house for the new pet. In the accompanying classroom activity, students use equivalent fractions to solve a problem and create word problems of their own.
Skill: Explain why two or more fractions are equivalent by using visual fraction models. Focus attention on how the number and size of the parts differ even though the fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.1
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Determine which class wins the bubble gum blowing contest by comparing fractions based on how many students blew bubbles and the size of each class. This interactive exercise focuses on fractions with unlike denominators using number lines and takes math out of the classroom and into the real world.
Skill: Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models, by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2 . Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.2
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video
Students are guided through a conceptual understanding of multiplying fractions by whole numbers using repeated addition and visual fraction models.
Skill: Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number e.g., by using a visual such as a number line or area model.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.4
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Lesson Plan
Students are asked to recognize the equivalence of fractional tenths and decimals, and to do simple decimal addition to find lengths both shorter and longer than 1. This CYBERCHASE activity is motivated by video clips in which the CyberSquad is trying to make repairs to railroad tracks that Hacker keeps sabotaging. The tracks are measured in decimal lengths, so the CyberSquad has to find out how to add decimals to get the lengths they need when they replace missing rails.
Skill: Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.4 For example, express 3/10 as 30/100, and add 3/10 + 4/100 = 34/100. Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100. For example, rewrite 0.62 as 62/100; describe a length as 0.62 meters; locate 0.62 on a number line diagram
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.5 MGSE4.NF.6
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive
Students are asked to compare decimals and plot decimal numbers on a number line by reasoning about their relational values. Students have several opportunities to complete practice problems using number lines throughout this lesson.
Skill: Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual model.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.NF.7
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video and Practice
Compare the strength of Ron's and Hermione's magic using multiplication.
Skill: Understand that a multiplicative comparison is a situation in which one quantity is multiplied by a specified number to get another quantity.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.OA.1
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Interactive Problem Solving
Students will play the role of the Director who is responsible for achieving the creative, visual, and auditory effect of a production. This animated interactive job exploration experience connects schoolwork with real work by guiding students to use math skills to determine the budget for the Kids Work! ETV Festival.
Skill: Solve multi step word problems with whole numbers and having whole number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a symbol or letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.OA.3
 
 
Source: PBS Learning Media
Resource Type: Video with Discussion Questions
In this Cyberchase video segment, the CyberSquad is trying to figure out the location of Icky, the guardian of the Electric Eel of Aquari-Yum. The clue to his location lies in eight bubbles filled with pictures and numbers. The kids are told to find two numbers whose product is 20. Realizing that the pair of 10 and 2 is not an option, they use seashells to create an array to test out possible factors.
Skill: Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite.
Georgia Standard: MGSE4.OA.4