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Conservation of Energy

We explore the inner workings of a hydroelectric dam as we learn about the law of conservation of energy. The difference between conservative and non-conservative forces is illustrated and we work through an example problem involving gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy.

Segment 4H: Conservation of Energy We explore the inner workings of a hydroelectric dam as we learn about the law of conservation of energy. The difference between conservative and non-conservative forces is illustrated and we work through an example problem involving gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy.

Premiere Date: July 24, 2018 | Runtime: 00:08:16

Support Materials

Learning Objectives

-Define the law of conservation of energy and apply it to real-world situations.

-Observe the law of conservation of energy in action by looking at energy transformations.

-Differentiate between conservative and non-conservative forces.

Toolkit

Note-Taking Guide and Questions to Consider
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Practice Problems
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Conservation of Energy Roller Coaster Lab
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Vocabulary

conservative force - forces that cause energy to be converted into forms that be easily regained; examples are gravity, the electrostatic force, and the spring force.

gravitational potential energy (PEG) - the stored energy of an object due to its position relative to a reference point on Earth; is equal to the mass of an object multiplied by the acceleration due to gravity multiplied by the height of the object relative to the reference point.

kinetic energy (KE) - the energy of motion; equal to one half times mass times the square of the velocity of an object.

law of conservation of energy - energy is never created or destroyed; it is transferred or transformed from one form to another.

non-conservative force - forces that cause energy to be converted into forms that cannot be easily regained; examples are friction and air resistance.

Georgia Standards of Excellence

SP3
Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the importance of conservation laws for mechanical energy and linear momentum in predicting the behavior of physical systems.
a
Ask questions to compare and contrast open and closed systems.
b
Use mathematics and computational thinking to analyze, evaluate, and apply the principle of conservation of energy and the Work-Kinetic Energy Theorem. • Calculate the kinetic energy of an object. • Calculate the amount of work performed by a force on an object.
c
Plan and carry out an investigation demonstrating conservation and rate of transfer of energy (power) to solve problems involving closed systems.

Request Teacher Toolkit

The Physics in Motion teacher toolkit provides instructions and answer keys for study questions, practice problems, labs for all seven units of study.  GPB offers the teacher toolkit at no cost to Georgia educators. It will be available in September 2018. To preorder your teacher toolkit, complete and submit this form to request the teacher toolkit. You only need to submit this form one time to get materials for all seven units of study.