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Episode 610

This week on Georgia Traveler It’s time to ride the horses in Alpharetta and play polo on the ...

Sat 6:30pm:
Episode 610

This week on Georgia Traveler It’s time to ride the horses in Alpharetta and play polo on the ...

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Episode 610

This week on Georgia Traveler It’s time to ride the horses in Alpharetta and play polo on the ...

Fri 8:00pm:
Speed & Feed

This week on Georgia Traveler. . . “Speed and Feed” …. We journey to Morganton with Host ...



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Rickey Bevington

Today In Georgia History

By Rickey BevingtonPosted September 2, 2011 5:30pm (EDT)
Today In Georgia History

Hey Georgia Travelers! We're having a ball traveling all over the state shooting and producing stories for our upcoming season of the show. Tune in for my visits to Chickamauga Battlefield, Andersonville National Historic Site, Fort Pulaski National Monument, Fort McAllister State Park, Resaca Confederate Cemetery and more historical places. But Civil War sites are a mere glimpse at the extraordinary history of our great state. Now, GPB TV, GPB Radio and www.gpb.org have a new way for you to learn about Georgia history every day. Check it out!

Click here to see Today In Georgia History.

Here's the entry for September 2:

1864 Sherman Captures Atlanta

"Atlanta is ours, and fairly won": the immortal words of General William T. Sherman when he captured Atlanta on this date in 1864. Sherman had taken the Deep South's major manufacturing center and railroad hub, a huge loss for the Confederacy.

Unwilling to attack Atlanta's strong defenses, U.S. forces swept west and south around the city. At Jonesboro they cut the last railroad supplying Atlanta, forcing General John Bell Hood's Confederates to abandon the city. Atlantans who remained were rudely awakened that morning by the apocalyptic explosions of Hood's ammunition train being blown up by Confederates—a scene immortalized 75 years later in “Gone with the Wind.” Atlanta Mayor James Calhoun surrendered the city to Sherman in a formal note, saying, "The fortune of war has placed Atlanta in your hands." The 2nd Massachusetts Regiment reached downtown first and raised the American flag over City Hall.

President Abraham Lincoln's re–election in November, and final Confederate defeat seven months later were both virtually assured after Atlanta's fall on September 2, 1864, Today in Georgia History.

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