Fri., September 6, 2013 11:00am (EDT)

Helping Young Offenders Find Work
By Associated Press
Updated: 11 months ago

ATLANTA  —  
Georgia is trying to give young criminal offenders an advantage as they seek to enter the workforce. Those convicted of juvenile offenses frequently face hurdles when looking for a job. That can be discouraging and can lead them to become repeat offenders. (Photo Courtesy of Angela Archer via Flickr.)
Georgia is trying to give young criminal offenders an advantage as they seek to enter the workforce. Those convicted of juvenile offenses frequently face hurdles when looking for a job. That can be discouraging and can lead them to become repeat offenders. (Photo Courtesy of Angela Archer via Flickr.)
Georgia is trying to give young criminal offenders an advantage as they seek to enter the workforce.

The Department of Juvenile Justice is teaming up with the Governor's Office of Workforce Development for the Re-Entry Skills Preparation and Education Career Training, or RESPECT, program.

Those convicted of juvenile offenses frequently face hurdles when looking for a job. That can be discouraging and can lead them to become repeat offenders.

The program aims to ensure young people released from correctional programs have the information, education and training they need to get a job. Participants focus on developing skills like workplace etiquette, resume building and interview preparation.