Mon., July 15, 2013 12:15pm (EDT)

Hill's Execution Halted
By Jeanne Bonner and the Associated Press
Updated: 9 months ago

JACKSON, Ga.  —  
This isn't the first time Warren Lee Hill's execution has been halted because of a challenge to the state's execution method. (Photo Courtesy of Georgia Department of Corrections.)
This isn't the first time Warren Lee Hill's execution has been halted because of a challenge to the state's execution method. (Photo Courtesy of Georgia Department of Corrections.)
A Fulton County judge has temporarily stayed a scheduled execution Monday after the inmate's attorneys raised questions about a controversial new state law prohibiting the release of information involving Georgia's execution drug supply.

Hill, who was sentenced to death for the 1990 beating death of a fellow inmate, was scheduled to be executed at the state prison in Jackson at 7 p.m. Monday.

His attorney, Brian Kammer, said he challenged the constitutionality of the law, which shields from public view the identities of the lethal injection drug’s manufacturer.

“If it’s a tainted batch of drug, we would have a claim that it caused a cruel and unusual execution,” he told GPB.

He said the Georgia Department of Corrections only announced last week that it would use a drug from a compounding pharmacy to execute Hill. He said there have been problems with execution drugs obtained from compounding pharmacies.

“They’re unregulated," Kammer said. "They get their ingredients from questionable sources. The ingredients are often contaminated – to the extent that’s been studied – with bacteria, fungus, stuff that can cause an immediate reaction.”

This isn't the first time Warren Lee Hill's execution has been halted because of a challenge to the state's execution method. Last July, his execution was put on hold pending a challenge to the state's plan to change from a three-drug process to a single dose of pentobarbital.

Hill was sentenced to death for the 1990 beating death of a fellow inmate.

Attorneys are hoping the U.S. Supreme Court intervenes to prevent the execution because they say Hill is mentally disabled.

A spokeswoman for state Attorney General Sam Olens said he had no comment.