Fri., April 5, 2013 7:52am (EDT)

WORKING: Beating The Bias
By Joshua Stewart
Updated: 1 year ago

ATLANTA  —  
When you go on a job interview, the candidates that have come before you can actually have an impact on how the interviewers view your performance. That’s due to the inherent biases of job interviewers (and all people). Brandon Smith explains how to beat those biases. (Photo Courtesy of <a href=http://www.flickr.com/photos/timpatterson/476098132/>Tim Patterson via Flickr</a>.)
When you go on a job interview, the candidates that have come before you can actually have an impact on how the interviewers view your performance. That’s due to the inherent biases of job interviewers (and all people). Brandon Smith explains how to beat those biases. (Photo Courtesy of Tim Patterson via Flickr.)
When you go on a job interview, the candidates that have come before you can actually have an impact on how the interviewers view your performance.

It goes back to a bias we have that tells us a streaks of wins or losses or really good job candidates must be about to end. (Hear much more about that in this Morning Edition segment.)

But you don't have much control over whether you will interview at the end of a string or strong or weak candidates. So can you beat the bias? Our workplace and career expert Brandon Smith has a few ideas.

Brandon Smith teaches about leadership, communication, and workplace culture at Emory University's Goizueta Business School. More of his advice is on his blog and at theworkplacetherapist.com. While you’re there, ask him your workplace or career question. We might use your question on a future radio segment.