Tue., January 8, 2013 4:03pm (EST)

Immigration Caravan Stops In Georgia
By Ellen Reinhardt
Updated: 1 year ago

ATLANTA  —  
A bus caravan organized by the Farmworker Association of Florida and 6 other immigration advocate groups stopped in Atlanta Tuesday on their way to march in Washington.  The group plans to call on the Obama administration and Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform.  Caravan spokesman Ruben Solis-Garcia  says they want to take their message to the President before he is inaugurated for a second time. And they hope their message catches fire in Georgia. (photo by Jeanne Bonner)
A bus caravan organized by the Farmworker Association of Florida and 6 other immigration advocate groups stopped in Atlanta Tuesday on their way to march in Washington. The group plans to call on the Obama administration and Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform. Caravan spokesman Ruben Solis-Garcia says they want to take their message to the President before he is inaugurated for a second time. And they hope their message catches fire in Georgia. (photo by Jeanne Bonner)
A bus caravan organized by the Farmworker Association of Florida and 6 other immigration advocate groups stopped in Atlanta Tuesday on their way to march in Washington.

The group plans to call on the Obama administration and Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

Caravan spokesman Ruben Solis-Garcia says they want to take their message to the President before he is inaugurated for a second time. And they hope their message catches fire in Georgia.

“ To galvanize the support and activity in every southern state. So that it activates all the communities to be working together from where they’re at. Even if they are not in Washington for the inauguration.”he says.

He says Latinos played a decisive role in President Obama’s re-election. They want him to create a pathway to legal citizenship for undocumented immigrants. They also want an end to deportation of non-criminal immigrants.

Emery Wright, co-director of Project South, says there’s one thing he’d like to see changed here in Georgia.

“There was some legislation that passed here at the state House last year that really blocks some students from being able to go on to higher education, public education. And I think that’s one real simple thing that we could change here in Georgia.” Wright says.

Organizers say Latinos took a wait and see attitude on how President Obama would handle immigration reform in his first term. They say they won’t sit back and wait this time around.