Tue., November 6, 2012 3:42pm (EST)

Voting Problems Plague Fulton County
By Ellen Reinhardt
Updated: 2 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
One of Georgia’s largest counties is having problems this election day. Secretary of State Brian Kemp says there have been dozens of complaints regarding Fulton County.  Kemp says there are reports of technology problems and poll workers giving voters incorrect information. He says the biggest problems appear to be with people who thought they were registered to vote. (photo by Ellen Reinhardt)
One of Georgia’s largest counties is having problems this election day. Secretary of State Brian Kemp says there have been dozens of complaints regarding Fulton County. Kemp says there are reports of technology problems and poll workers giving voters incorrect information. He says the biggest problems appear to be with people who thought they were registered to vote. (photo by Ellen Reinhardt)
One of Georgia’s largest counties had problems on Tuesday's. Secretary of State Brian Kemp says there have been dozens of complaints regarding Fulton County.

Kemp says there were reports of technology problems and poll workers giving voters incorrect information. He says the biggest problems appear to be with people who thought they were registered to vote.

“We were assured that the resources would be there to handle these type things. And from what it looks like, there just hasn’t been enough people to get all the folks that were trying to register to vote into the system. And because of that you’ve got these election day surprises.” he says.

Kemp says officials have been worried about registration after the head of Fulton County’s elections stepped down when he was charged with drunk driving.

Kemp says a number of voters who thought they had been registered haven’t shown up on the rolls. So they had to use provisional ballots.

He says “We’ve gotten a few instances where precincts have run out of provisional ballots. Cause we’ve told those folks, look, if you thought you registered by the deadline and you should be on the rolls, go to the precinct, vote a provisional ballot.”

Those ballots won’t be counted until officials can determine if the voters are actually registered.

One precinct in Emmanuel County had to remain open later than scheduled Tuesday evening due to a power outage. But officials got a court order to extend voting by 50 minutes in that precinct.

Kemp says otherwise, voting appears to have run smoothly across the state.