Tue., June 12, 2012 12:06pm (EDT)

Human Remains May Lie Under Building
By Associated Press
Updated: 2 years ago

GAINESVILLE, Ga.  —  
Piles of pants are visible as onlookers watch the Cooper Pants Factory be demolished after a tornado hit Hall County on April 6, 1936. (photo courtesy Digital Library of Georgia)
Piles of pants are visible as onlookers watch the Cooper Pants Factory be demolished after a tornado hit Hall County on April 6, 1936. (photo courtesy Digital Library of Georgia)
City officials in Gainesville have approved demolition of a building at the site of one of the nation's deadliest tornadoes 76 years ago.

A local architect says human remains might still be buried there, and he says an archaeological investigation is needed.

The Times of Gainesville reports that several factory workers were killed when the tornado tore through the town on April 6, 1936.

Architect Garland Reynolds Jr. is asking the city council to authorize the archaeological study. He also proposed that the city-owned land be turned into a park to memorialize the tragedy.

The tornado collapsed the roof of the Cooper Pants Factory, touching off a fire that killed up to 125 workers who were trapped inside. Some bodies were never identified.

City crews could start demolition this week.