Wed., May 2, 2012 6:30am (EDT)

Art Of Gaman: Living Interned
By Joshua Stewart
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Updated: 2 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
This carved stone teapot created by Homei Iseyama at the Japanese internment camp in Topaz, Utah, is among the items on display at the Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum in Atlanta through May 31. (Photo by Terry Heffernan, Courtesy of the Breman Museum.)
This carved stone teapot created by Homei Iseyama at the Japanese internment camp in Topaz, Utah, is among the items on display at the Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum in Atlanta through May 31. (Photo by Terry Heffernan, Courtesy of the Breman Museum.)
After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, the U.S. government decided people of Japanese descent on the west coast were a potential threat. So the military moved more than 100,000 of them inland to internment camps throughout the West, where they lived for up to four years.

Atlanta’s Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum is remembering those years with an exhibit of objects and art some of the internees made at the camps. Museum director Aaron Berger said they were born of both necessity and creativity.

The Art of Gaman exhibit continues through May 31.