Wed., March 28, 2012 2:50pm (EDT)

Sine Die: Deadline Day Ticks Down
By Parker Wallace
Updated: 2 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
Thursday is the final day of political wrangling before lawmakers end this year's legislative session.  The 40th day of the session is called sine die. It’s the final day for lawmakers to pass bills for the Governor to sign. (GPB File Photo)
Thursday is the final day of political wrangling before lawmakers end this year's legislative session. The 40th day of the session is called sine die. It’s the final day for lawmakers to pass bills for the Governor to sign. (GPB File Photo)
Thursday is the final day of political wrangling before lawmakers end this year's legislative session.

The 40th day of the session is called sine die. That’s a Latin term that means “without assigning another day.” It sounds like SIGN OR DIE, which, is actually the case. It’s the final day for lawmakers to pass bills for the Governor to sign.

Tom Crawford, of the Georgia Report describes bills to watch on Day 40:

“Abortion is probably gone for this session, now let me say, it’s never over till it’s over when you’re talking about the General Assembly, but I would be very surprised if the abortion bill came back for a vote. There is still going to be an effort to get some bills out to allow people to carry guns in a wider range of places. The immigration bill—that also appears to be stopped and won’t come up for a vote, but there’s always a slight possibility that something will happen.

“I think we will have some debate about a bill that would ban mass union picketing near private residences, that’s from Don Balfour, a very controversial bill, but it looks like the House will be voting on that. The House may vote on another bill, which would allow developers that owe money to banks to walk away from some of their loans.”

Governor Deal accomplished all of his legislative priorities this session, from criminal justice reform to a charter schools amendment. The legislature also passed the Governor’s 19.2 billion dollar budget for the next fiscal year.

He spoke today about the bills he thinks will do the most to improve the state of Georgia.

“The criminal justice reform package I think is a significant piece of legislation for the future of our state as well as the tax reform package. Those are probably two that stand out. The passage of the constitutional amendment to allow the citizens of this state of Georgia to express their opinion about charter schools, I think is another significant achievement.”