Fri., July 1, 2011 8:23am (EDT)

Many New Laws Now In Effect
By Edgar Treiguts
Updated: 3 years ago

ATLANTA   —  
Many bills passed by state lawmakers in the General Assembly and signed by the Governor go into effect Friday, July 1. (GPB file photo)
Many bills passed by state lawmakers in the General Assembly and signed by the Governor go into effect Friday, July 1. (GPB file photo)
A federal judge blocked two sections of Georgia's immigration law, but the rest of the law is set to take effect. Beginning Friday, it will be a felony to use false documents when applying for a job. Another part of the law creates a board to investigate complaints about government officials not complying with state laws on illegal immigration. Starting January 1st, businesses with 500 or more employees will have to use a federal database to check the immigration status of new hires, a requirement that will be phased in for all businesses with more than 10 employees by July 2013. Judge Thomas Thrash on Monday blocked two sections of the law until a lawsuit filed by the groups challenging the law's constitutionality can be resolved.

Several other new Georgia laws take effect on Friday, July 1st.

Those include the bill to allow Sunday alcohol sales in Georgia, if local voters give the ‘ok’ in referendum balloting. Already, several Georgia cities and municipalities have scheduled a referendum vote on the issue in the coming months.

The child booster seat law - All children in the state under the age of 8 will have to ride in the rear of a vehicle in a car or booster seat. Advocates say the law clears-up some of the confusion parents have when it comes to their children’s safety. A first offense brings a $50 fine. A second would draw a fine of $100.

Health care compact bill (HB 461) – Georgia could join with other states with the aim to avoid federal control over health care policy. The compact would need congressional approval.

Billboard clear-cut bill (HB 179) – Billboard owners now have the right to clear state-owned roadside trees that block a driver’s view of their signs.


Contributors: Associated Press