Wed., April 27, 2011 11:49pm (EDT)

10 Twisters Hit Georgia
By Associated Press
Updated: 3 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
A tornado destroyed many homes in the community of Pinelog in Bartow County. (photo by Melissa Stiers)
A tornado destroyed many homes in the community of Pinelog in Bartow County. (photo by Melissa Stiers)
Experts say deadly storms that raked Georgia this week spawned at least 10 tornadoes, including a rare EF-4 tornado that pummeled Catoosa County with 175 mph winds.

National Weather Service meteorologist Jessica Sieux said Friday it's possible more tornadoes will be added to the list as survey teams continue investigating reports.

The weather service concluded the most powerful tornado hit Ringgold and surrounding Catoosa County, cutting a path of destruction 13 miles long and one-third mile wide. Eight people were killed in the county and up to 100 homes were damaged or destroyed.

Experts also say three tornadoes, with winds of 110 mph to 150 mph, touched down in Dade County — where two people died and numerous homes and buildings were demolished.

Authorities say the death toll from fierce storms that tore through Georgia has climbed to at least 15. State officials say at least 114 people were injured across the state.

Gov. Nathan Deal and Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA) Director Charley English toured storm-damaged areas in northwest Georgia and western Middle Georgia Thursday.

The governor declared a state of emergency in Bartow, Coweta, Greene, Lamar, Meriwether, Monroe, Morgan, Pickens, Polk, Rabun, Spalding, and Troup counties. That brings the total number of counties under a state of emergency to 16.

A tornado struck the farm community of Pinelog in Bartow county. It tore the roof off of cattle farmer Shane Bramlett’s house and his mother’s who lives next door.

"When it got gone, we come out of the basement and started trying to look around best we could with flashlights, and seen everything was gone, it was just a catastrophe," says Bramlett.

A whole neighborhood was destroyed further down the road. Joe West is a construction worker who assessed the damage.

"I’ve seen a lot of houses that have just been completely tore off, the foundation, the roofs ripped off, trees snapped like twigs, basically just a natural disaster," says West. "I mean there’s horses in pastures that are dead."


Contributors: Edgar Treiguts, Melissa Stiers