Fri., December 31, 2010 4:01pm (EST)

Army Corps Considers Preemptive Drought Plan
By Noel Brown
Updated: 3 years ago

AUGUSTA, Ga.  —  
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to reduce the flow of water from the J. Strom Thurmond Dam to the Savannah River. (Image courtesy C.D. Harrison via Flikr)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to reduce the flow of water from the J. Strom Thurmond Dam to the Savannah River. (Image courtesy C.D. Harrison via Flikr)
Right now the Corps' reservoirs along the Savannah River are in mild drought conditions.

That means water levels at lakes Hartwell, Russell and Thurmond are lower than average.

The corps operates the reservoirs as a single system with water flowing from one into the other and ending up in the Savannah River.

Flows from Lake Thurmond have already been reduced following last years drought.

Officials say if current conditions continue they will have to hold back even more water flowing into the river.

Tim Barett with the state Department of Natural Resources says it’s because of a warm and dry La Nina winter that’s predicted to continue into the Summer.

"This is kind of a proactive step they are taking to keep some water up in the reservoirs in case the forecasts come true and we do go into a severe drought later in the year."

According to a recent study by the Corps the plan will have no negative environmental impact.

The Corps is taking public comment on the plan until noon on Monday.