Mon., September 28, 2009 8:52am (EDT)

Heavy Rains Bring Mushrooms
By Josephine Bennett
Updated: 5 years ago

MACON, Ga.  —  
Mushrooms along the Ocmulgee River in Macon (photo by Josephine Bennett)
Mushrooms along the Ocmulgee River in Macon (photo by Josephine Bennett)
After the rains came the mushrooms. Why do we have so many, and how long will they stick around?

You may have noticed that mushrooms are everywhere; in parks, yards and athletic fields. The weather conditions are perfect for the formation of these mythical fungi. In some places they're growing in circles up to fifty yards across.

Charles Mims is a retired professor and mycologist. That's the term for a mushroom expert. He says the weather conditions are just right for an explosion of mushrooms.

"We've been in this really dry period for awhile, and then suddenly we're just inundated with water. So, everything is reproducing at once now."

Mims says fungi stay in the microscopic stage for a long time and when they have this much water they can literally expand overnight. Unfortunately, most of the large, white mushrooms you see are poisonous and will not be back for a year.