Mon., September 21, 2009 6:04pm (EDT)

Rainfall Sets 100-Year Record
By Susanna Capelouto
Updated: 5 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
From Sunday afternoon through Monday afternoon, parts of the state have had historic rainfall amounts, leading to flooding. (photo by John Sepulvado)
From Sunday afternoon through Monday afternoon, parts of the state have had historic rainfall amounts, leading to flooding. (photo by John Sepulvado)
North Georgia has had excessive rain since late last week.

From Sunday afternoon through Monday afternoon parts of the region had more than eight inches.

"That is historic," said state climatologist David Stooksbury. "We expect to receive eight inches of rain only once in a hundred years. So this is an unprecedented rainfall event."

Stooksbury warned communities in central and south Georgia to stay watchful throughout the week.

He says the flood waters in the Chattahoochee, Yellow and Flint Rivers will impact downstream residents later.

"This is the situation where you might not have a large amount of rainfall near where you’re living,” said Stooksbury. "But upstream if they had large amounts of rainfalls you’re going to see the streams rise."

Stooksbury said much of the flooding is reminiscent of the remnants of tropical storm Alberto which flooded parts of the state in 1994.

He added that there's an old saying about drought which is "a drought ends in a flood." And that, said Stooksbury, is what we're seeing right now in Georgia.