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The Weeping Time | Family Secrets, Shame | Mental Health Courts

One of the largest slave sales in U.S. history happened in Savannah, but it’s largely unknown. During a two-day period in 1859, more than 400 people were sold to slave owners from across the Southeast, an event that became known as “The Weeping Time.” Plus, Karen Branan grew up in a small Georgia town and observed the acute racism that marked the era. Later in life, as a journalist, Branan made a shocking discovery about her family involving a grisly lynching. Also, Georgia has some of the harshest immigration policies in the country, but does it help or hurt the economy? And four years ago, one in every six inmates in the state prison system was mentally ill. Since then, the state has established 25 accountability courts to break the link between mental illness and crime.



Full Show - February 3, 2016

Four years ago, one in every six inmates in the state prison system was mentally ill. Since then, the state has established 25 accountability courts to break the link between mental illness and crime. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Dekalb Superior Court Judge Asha Jackson and Macon Superior Court Judge Verda Colvin about how mental health courts work and their effectiveness.

Also, Georgia has some of the harshest immigration policies in the country, but does it help or hurt the economy? Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Wesley Tharpe, the senior analyst at the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, about the economic impact of the state’s immigration laws. Plus, one of the largest slave sales in U.S. history happened in Savannah, but it’s largely unknown. During a two-day period in 1859, more than 400 people were sold to slave owners from across the Southeast, an event that became known as “The Weeping Time.” Kwesi DeGraft-Hanson is a landscape architect in Atlanta, and he’s giving a lecture this week at Emory University about the massive slave auction. Host Celeste Headlee talks with him about why he’s trying to find living decedents of these slaves.

And author Karen Branan grew up in a small Georgia town in the where she observed the acute racism that marked the era. Later in life, as a journalist, Branan made a shocking discovery about her family. It involves a grisly lynching that took place over a century ago, a racially charged crime perpetrated by a member of her extended family. Host Celeste Headlee sits down with Branan to talk about her eye-opening historical investigation into the well-kept skeletons hidden in her family’s past.