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Artists Against Police Brutality | Schools & Business | Artists Who Own

A creative anthology called “Artists Against Police Brutality” takes a stand against violence at the hands of law enforcement and features a collection of comic strips, flash fiction, and essays from artists and writers across the country. Plus, a co-founder of Athens-based Umano Clothing tells us about their business model, which involves artwork created by schoolchildren. And Atlanta’s art scene is on the rise, but there’s still not a place in the city where artists can call their own. The Goat Farm Arts Center is hoping to change that.



Full Show - December 16, 2015

Atlanta’s art scene is on the rise, but there’s still not a place in the city where artists can call their own. The Goat Farm Arts Center is hoping to change that with their new program, Beacons. The Beacons project mixes real estate prowess with art to connect artists with below-market rents in Atlanta’s Broad Street neighborhood to establish a thriving arts community. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with The Goat Farm’s Mark DiNatale and Erin Bailey, who teaches business workshops to artists, about the Beacons project and teaching artists the skills they need to stay put.

Plus, Jonathan and Alex Torrey of Athens, Georgia secured an investment on the ABC show “Shark Tank” for their clothing company Umano. Their shirt designs come from children’s artwork they collect through partner schools in their hometown and beyond. Host Celeste Headlee talks to the Torrey brothers about the “Shark Tank” bump and how they give back to the students who create their designs. Then, we broaden the conversation to examine fundraising in schools and how companies use the school system as a source of revenue with Georgia State University’s Deron Boyles.

And there’s a long standing connection between activism and art. Art has been used in social and political movements throughout history to inspire change. Now, a creative anthology takes a stand against violence at the hands of law enforcement. It’s called “Artists Against Police Brutality” and features a collection of comic strips, flash fiction, and essays from artists and writers across the country. The proceeds from the book go to The Innocence Project. Host Celeste Headlee speak with Jason Rodriguez, who edited the anthology, and Georgia artist Melanie Stevens about art’s role in the Black Lives Matter movement.