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The Love Jones Generation | Bargain Mansions | Peach Pubescence

Looking for a 6,000 square foot mansion under a million bucks? Then come to Georgia! A recent analysis by the real estate listing site Trulia found that Georgia is one of the top states with “bargain mansions.” And, the nineties were a pivotal time for black Americans -- the national rise of Southern hip-hop, the O.J. Simpson trial, and the recorded beating of Rodney King by a group of Los Angeles police officers. Meet students from a Georgia State University class that’s working to preserve the “Love Jones generation.”



Full Show - November 24, 2015

Looking for a 6,000 square foot mansion under a million bucks? Then come to Georgia! A recent analysis by the real estate listing site Trulia found that Georgia is one of the top states with “bargain mansions.” But how common are they? Host Celeste Headlee talks to Trulia’s housing economist, Ralph McLaughlin, and luxury agent Susan Thompson from Keller Williams Realty Buckhead.

Then, the nineties were a pivotal time for black Americans-the national rise of Southern hip hop, the O.J. Simpson trial, and the recorded beating of Rodney King by a group of Los Angeles police officers. As part of our “Lessons from Left Field” series, we look at a Georgia State University class that’s working to preserve the “Love Jones generation.” Host Celeste Headlee talks about the class with GSU professor Scott Heath and three of his students.

And for more than a hundred years, Georgia has claimed the peach as its own. The fruit adorns our license plates and our street names, and it earns money for the state. But what makes the peach such a Southern success? Its sweet taste, of course, but also its fuzzy skin according to Kennesaw State University Professor Thomas Okie. His theory about peach skin – also known as peach pubescence – is featured in the book, “The Georgia Peach: Culture, Agriculture, and Environment in the American South.” Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Okie about peach farming in Georgia. Dan Horton, professor emeritus of entomology at the University of Georgia, and Al Pearson, a fourth-generation peach farmer and co-owner of Pearson Farms, also join the conversation.