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Economics Of Early Education | Folk Music School | Auntie Rosa | Poet Anya Silver

Frank Hamilton is a legend in the American folk revival scene. He performed throughout the 1950s and 1960s with The Weavers and Pete Seeger. Now a longtime Atlanta resident, Hamilton has decided to open a folk music school in Candler Park. Plus, this weekend marks the tenth anniversary of Rosa Parks’ death. Her great nephew Broderick Carnes of Lawrenceville, Georgia shares the lessons he learned from his Great Auntie Rosa. We also speak with Macon poet Anya Silver, whose work recently earned her a Georgia Author of the Year Award.



Full Show - October 22, 2015

Parents, teachers, and policymakers have declared for years that investment in early childhood education can give kids a strong foundation for school and close the achievement gap. A new study from the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank found a direct connection between providing early childhood education and a person’s economic outcome. The research shows it also affects the larger economy. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Minneapolis Federal Reserve economist Rob Grunewald and Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education Policy and Research Director Dana Rickman about the impact of investing in early childhood education.

And Frank Hamilton is a legend in the American folk revival scene. He performed throughout the 1950s and 1960s with The Weavers and Pete Seeger. Now a longtime Atlanta resident, Hamilton has decided to open a folk music school in Candler Park. On Tuesday nights, students gather to learn instruments like guitar, fiddle and banjo, and to jam with Hamilton. We stop by the school for a music lesson, and host Celeste Headlee talks to Frank Hamilton about folk music’s significance today. Plus, this weekend marks the tenth anniversary of Rosa Parks’ death. The Civil Rights icon was honored earlier this year when the Library of Congress displayed thousands of her letters and photographs. Relatives of Rosa Parks had the chance to view some of the items for the first time before the collection opened to the public. Her great nephew Broderick Carnes of Lawrenceville, Georgia was among them. He shares the lessons he learned from his Great Auntie Rosa and what’s been misunderstood about her legacy.

Finally, Anya Silver says her poetry has helped her come to terms with mortality. The Mercer University professor was recently awarded the Georgia Author of the Year award for poetry for her book, “I Watched You Disappear.” Host Celeste Headlee talks with Silver about her creative explorations of life, death and dying.