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Ranking Hospitals | Savannah's Punk Scene | Latino or Hispanic?

Nearly one out of every five people in America have Hispanic roots. Or, is it Latino roots? We break down the difference. Plus, Savannah has become a hub for punk bands, both with local groups seeing success and with national acts making the city a part of their tour. Why Savannah, and why now? And how much stock should patients really put into hospital rankings, and just how are they put together?



Full Show - September 15, 2015

Augusta's Children’s Hospital of Georgia was recently ranked at the top of the list for pediatric care by a quality-ranking report. But how much stock should patients really put into these rankings, and just how are they put together? Host Celeste Headlee speaks to Ben Harder, who is responsible for the U.S. News and World Report “Best Hospital” rankings, and Kathy Kinlaw, Director of Emory Center for Ethics Program in Health Sciences and Ethics.

Also, Savannah has become a hub for punk bands, both with local groups seeing success and with national acts making the city a part of their tour. Why Savannah, and why now? Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Bill Dawers, founder and editor of the Hissing Lawns music blog. We also hear from one of Savannah’s rising punk bands, Crazy Bag Lady. Then we turn things up with the latest installment of our Georgia Playlist series. Nate Stewart of the Atlanta-based group The Landmines shares songs by his two favorite punk rock bands from the Peach State. Plus, Georgia leads the nation in the ratio of residents who are on probation or parole. Governor Nathan Deal hopes to bring that number down. His latest strategy is a new state agency that merges oversight of both parolees and probationers called the Department of Community Supervision. Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Michael Caputo recently rode along with one of the department’s new officers and weighs the pros and cons of the merger.

And according to the U.S. Census, Hispanics are the largest minority group in the country – and their numbers are growing. Nearly one out of every five people in America have Hispanic roots. Or, is it Latino roots? Host Celeste Headlee offers an explainer on when to use which term and why the concepts of “Latino” and “Hispanic” are purely American ones. She’s also joined by Hector Fernandez, a professor in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Georgia State University, to talk about linguistic and cultural differences among America’s Latino and Hispanic populations.