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Affirmative Action & College Admissions | LGBT Institute | Coming Out In The South

The Supreme Court is expected to make a major ruling on the issue of affirmative action in higher education. Trends show women outpace men in college attendance, but if college admissions were solely based on test scores, campuses would be overwhelmingly female. Also, this week, Atlanta's Center for Civil and Human Rights opens up its LGBT Institute and a new anthology features the stories of 16 Southerners and their true-life experiences of coming out to family and friends.



Full Show - September 1, 2015

The Supreme Court is expected to make a major ruling on the issue of affirmative action in higher education. The court will revisit the case of a white, female student who was denied admission to the University of Texas at Austin. Her lawyers claim African-American and Latino students were admitted to the school, despite lower test scores. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with Dana Thompson Dorsey, an assistant professor of educational leadership and policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, about what affirmative action is and what the court’s ruling could mean for diversity in education.

The national conversation about affirmative action centers on the issue of race, but another disparity that’s often overlooked is gender. Trends show women outpace men in college attendance, but if college admissions were solely based on test scores, campuses would be overwhelmingly female. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Maureen Downey about whether the public would produce the same outcry over gender-conscious college admissions as it does with race. Plus, two months after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage, activists are exploring the next big hurdle for LGBT rights. This week, Atlanta's Center for Civil and Human Rights opens up its LGBT Institute, a place for those ideas to be examined. Host Celeste Headlee talks with the institute’s Ryan Roemerman and Tim’m West about the conversations they hope to spark.

Host Celeste Headlee looks back on historical events that shaped the modern LGBT rights movement with two representatives from the new LGBT Institute in Atlanta. Then, a new anthology features the stories of 16 Southerners and their true-life experiences of coming out to family and friends. For some, it was realizing the first time they were in love, and for others, it was discovering peers who felt the same way they did. Two of the contributors, Drew Plant and Suzanne Lea, are from Atlanta and will be talking about the book at this weekend’s Decatur Book Festival. Host Celeste Headlee speaks with them about their stories, and ponders whether it’s more difficult to come out in the South than in other parts of the country.