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Drug Courts | Vocal Bias | Future Of Speech | Flannery O'Connor Stamp

Controversial former Georgia Superior Court Judge Amanda Williams was indicted Wednesday on two counts – violation of her oath of honor and making false statements. The grand jury decision to indict comes after a years-long investigation into Williams’ sentencing practices in her Glynn County drug court.

Full Show - June 4, 2015




Today's Show Segments

Your First Thoughts today are about expanding Medicare in Georgia to help with overcrowding in emergency rooms.



Controversial former Georgia Superior Court Judge Amanda Williams was indicted Wednesday on two counts – violation of her oath of honor and making false statements. The grand jury decision to indict comes after a years-long investigation into Williams’ sentencing practices in her Glynn County drug court. Critics found her excessively punitive and “This American Life” even dedicated a special episode to the story of a former addict who had gone before Williams’ bench. Drug courts have always been a hotly-debated legal model. Do they work? Do they help addicts recover? Is there enough oversight? Host Celeste Headlee discusses drug courts and Williams' story with Washington University law professor Mae Quinn and Terry Dickson, the Georgia editor of the Florida Times Union.



Host Celeste Headlee can tell you how tough it is to be a woman judged by the sound of her voice. Bias based on voice usually has to do with gender and female voices are more harshly criticized. Headlee talks about speech, sound and gender discrimination with Florida Atlantic University professor Rindy Anderson and Adam Ragusea, Mercer University journalism professor and host of “The Pub” podcast.



James Harbeck is a linguist, not a psychic, but he thinks he has how we’ll talk in the future all figured out. What words and speech behaviors will prevail and which will be history? He joins host Celeste Headlee to discuss.



Flannery O’Connor is considered one of Georgia’s greatest fiction writers. Born in Savannah, O’Connor lived at her family farm in Milledgeville until her death from lupus in 1964 at the age of 39. Now fifty years after her death, she will be commemorated on a U.S. postage stamp to be released this week. Host Celeste Headlee talks about the author’s life and work with Brad Gooch, the author of the biography, Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor and Mary Lawrence, a Savannah artist and friend friend of the O’Connor family.