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Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Before hibernating, grizzly bears get fat fast but they don't get metabolic problems like diabetes. Understanding how fat bears stay healthy could lead to better treatments for humans.

Drug-Resistant Malaria Spreads Across Southeast Asia

The most effective drug we have against malaria is losing its potency in Southeast Asia. Doctors can still cure most forms of the disease, but it takes longer and more medications.

Making An All-American White House Dinner With Some African Flair

After Tuesday's African summit sessions, the White House is preparing to host the 50 heads of state and the chairman of the African Union for dinner. What goes into preparing a formal dinner for 400?

Fighting Genital Cutting Of British Girls: A Survivor Speaks Out

Her family said they were going on a vacation. But Nimco Ali was taken to a woman who performed genital mutilation. Now Ali is helping the more than 100,000 girls in the U.K. possibly at risk.

Why U.S. Hospitals Are Testing People For Ebola Virus

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has ordered health care providers to test recent travelers at risk for Ebola virus. So far none of those tests have come up positive.

Second American Aid Worker With Ebola Arrives At Emory

As a second American infected with Ebola arrived Tuesday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, an outbreak of the disease in Africa continues to spread. Nancy Writebol is one of more than 1,300 people who have contracted the disease since March.

From 'Good Times' To 'Honey Boo Boo': Who Is Poor On TV?

What do sitcoms, dramas and reality TV say about poor people? For our yearlong series exploring poverty, NPR's Elizabeth Blair takes a look at the television shows that place the poor center stage.

Before 'Freedom Summer,' A Wave Of Violence Largely Forgotten

The killings of three civil rights activists in 1964 put pressure on Washington to fight racial terror in the South. But there were countless lesser-known attacks, like the one on Richard Joe Butler.

A Hospital Reboots Medicaid To Give Better Care For Less Money

In Cleveland, a public hospital may be succeeding at the seemingly impossible: saving money while making patients healthier. It's doing so by giving patients personalized attention.

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