Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal will sign a controversial gun bill Wednesday in Ellijay at a ceremony and luncheon that’s expected to attract many supporters and double as a Second Amendment rally. The so-called ‘guns everywhere’ bill will allow firearms in many churches, bars and government buildings. The bill will also bar sheriffs from asking someone with a gun if he or she has a license. Under the new bill, schools would have the option of deciding if teachers or administrators should be armed. The state will also have to report within 10 days Georgians’ involuntary commitments to hospitals.
 
The state Attorney General's office says, members of Savannah City Council broke the law three times when they met to discuss hiring a new city manager. The office says, the violations occurred when the council met behind closed doors. In one...
The state Capitol will be quiet this week, at least from official General Assembly activity. But lawmakers will have lots to do once they return next Monday for the final three days of the Session.
Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp says the U.S. Department of Justice has approved Georgia's requirement for new voter registration applicants to provide evidence of U.S. citizenship.
Advocates for the elderly are getting nervous about the fate of legislation that would let residents of assisted living homes stay there longer. The bill easily passed the Senate, but with three days left in the General Assembly, the House has yet...
Some domestic violence shelters in the state are worried they will lose funding to serve everyone who needs their services.
State lawmakers will jump into spring break a day earlier than originally planned, with no General Assembly session Friday. That move is to give legislators more time to iron-out sticking points in a proposed tax reform plan.
State lawmakers spent the week squabbling over whether a proposed tax plan would give every Georgian a tax break. And they’ve paid less attention to increasing state revenues.
State lawmakers were unable to come to an agreement Wednesday evening on a tax reform plan, so work will continue Thursday. A Republican-proposed measure would cut the state income tax from 6 to 4.5 percent. But it would add taxes on auto repair,...
State lawmakers cannot agree on a tax reform plan. And they have decided to take another week to resolve their differences.
Athens, Dunwoody, Macon, and Woodstock wanted it. Board chooses none of the proposed cities. Macon still has a chance to run the museum for a year.