Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal will sign a controversial gun bill Wednesday in Ellijay at a ceremony and luncheon that’s expected to attract many supporters and double as a Second Amendment rally. The so-called ‘guns everywhere’ bill will allow firearms in many churches, bars and government buildings. The bill will also bar sheriffs from asking someone with a gun if he or she has a license. Under the new bill, schools would have the option of deciding if teachers or administrators should be armed. The state will also have to report within 10 days Georgians’ involuntary commitments to hospitals.
 
The House has restored controversial provisions in its immigration bill that the Senate gutted Monday night.
A tax overhaul that Republicans had promoted as a key part of their agenda is dead for the legislative session. A joint legislative panel signed off on the bill Monday morning and it appeared headed to a full House vote the same day. But the House...
Georgia tax revenues are continuing to rebound. State money managers reported Friday that tax collections rose $107 million — or 10.7 percent — in March when compared to the same month last year.
Federal courts in Georgia's busy Northern District will remain open next week if the federal government shuts down. Northern District Clerk James Hatten said the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts notified federal courts across the...
Some Georgia doctors are girding themselves for another reduction in the Medicaid reimbursement rate. Lawmakers proposed the cut as part of the 2012 budget. Doctors worry it may further drive down their numbers from rural areas.
Right now lobbyists don’t have to report what they spend on state employees or the family members of elected officials.
Government could shut down at midnight. Military pay would be affected. Military payroll in Georgia exceeds 4-billion dollars a year.
A revised tax reform plan would create a large funding gap in the state budget next year. That’s according to a report by the state auditor. The plan would give nearly every Georgian a tax cut.
The state ethics commission says, lobbyists can spend undisclosed sums of money on most state employees.The decision Tuesday comes after high-speed rail advocates sent Georgia's House Speaker, his family and staff to Europe last year.
Lawmakers say they will let both bills sit for now. Local delegation could not agree on some key points. They plan to come up with another plan by next session.