Skip to main content

Business

Kurdish Officials Worry About Kurds Joining The Islamic State

In the Kurdish city of Halabja, young men have been disappearing to join ISIS. It's a trend the authorities don't really want to discuss. But they are clamping down to try to make it stop.

'Reshoring' Trend Has Little Impact On U.S. Economy, Study Finds

"Reshoring," or bringing U.S. jobs back from overseas, is not as prevalent as has been reported, a consulting firm's research finds. The study found a total of 300 cases from 2013.

Has Vladimir Putin Just Overplayed His Hand?

The Russia leader was riding high at home this year with the successful Winter Olympics and his annexation of Crimea. Now he's staring at a recession and has alienated Western nations that could help.

From Judges To Inmates, Finding The Human Casualties Of Mandatory Sentencing

Amid the backdrop of debate inside Washington and across the country, an NPR series will focus on the human toll of the tough mandatory minimum prison terms for drug crimes.

Listen To 'The Eye,' A New Song By Brandi Carlile

Brandi Carlile will put out her fifth album, The Firewatcher's Daughter, in March. She talks with Ann Powers about family, her new album and the necessary recklessness of first-take rock and roll.

Few Employers Cover Egg Freezing For Women With Cancer

Although egg freezing is the perk of the moment at some high-profile companies, the benefit isn't often available, even for women with serious illnesses that could affect their fertility.

FIFA Dismisses U.S. Lawyer's Appeal On Handling Of World Cup Report

Michael Garcia had filed an appeal against how his report into the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 soccer World Cup was handled. FIFA said his appeal is inadmissible.

Jeb Bush Announces He Will 'Actively Explore' Presidential Run

Bush, a GOP favorite, said he would establish a political action committee in January to "facilitate conversations with citizens across America."

Judge Regrets Harsh Human Toll Of Mandatory Minimum Sentences

Thousands of people are imprisoned for decades, if not life, because of tough drug sentences. Now judges, lawyers and advocates ask whether it's time to dial back those penalties.

Pages