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U.S. Charges Pakistani Man With Conspiracy Over His Spyware App

The Justice Department called this the "first-ever criminal case concerning the advertisement and sale of a mobile device spyware app."

Martha Zarway Of Monrovia: 'I'm A Doctor, So We Can't Run Away'

The Liberian physician, who operates a clinic in the capital, perseveres in the wake of a colleague's death, possibly from Ebola. She and her staff continue to treat patients.

What We Don't Know About Heart Disease Can Kill Us

People in the United Kingdom failed big time when they took a poll on risk factors for heart disease. Think you're more up to speed? Try our quickie quiz and find out.

Tests Of New Ebola Drugs Could Take Place As Early As November

New drugs and vaccines can take years to develop. But health officials and researchers are accelerating tests of experimental drugs to fight the outbreak in West Africa.

How Hong Kong Protesters Are Connecting, Without Cell Or Wi-Fi Networks

Pro-democracy protesters are downloading a fast-growing app called FireChat to stay in touch. It has been used around the world during political unrest.

At U.N., Iceland Announces Men-Only Conference On Gender Equality

During a speech in front of the General Assembly Gunnar Bragi said the conference would focus on violence against women and would be "unique" because only men and boys are invited.

Should You Do The Do-Over If There's A Chance For A Second Chance?

As world-class violinist Joshua Bell plans a second Washington, D.C. Metro performance, we reflect on the rare opportunity to try something again.

Afghanistan's New President: 'Hold Me Accountable'

Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai takes over from Hamid Karzai after a disputed election that forced a unity government with rival candidate Abdullah Abdullah.

Swedish Scientists Square Off Over Who Can Sneak In Most Dylan Lyrics

It all started in 1997, when two professors from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm published an article on flatulence titled "Nitric Oxide and inflammation: The answer is blowing in the wind."

California Enacts 'Yes Means Yes' Law, Defining Sexual Consent

The new law requires an "affirmative consent" and states that consent can't be given if someone is asleep or incapacitated by drugs or alcohol.

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