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Hiccups Were The Clue That Led Researchers To Ebola

Journalist Jeffrey Stern traveled to Guinea to find out why it took so long for scientists to figure out that the Ebola virus had struck. He tells a revealing tale in this month's Vanity Fair.

Obama To Announce Buildup In U.S. Efforts To Fight Ebola

The U.S. military plans to establish a medical base in Liberia to help stop the Ebola epidemic. It will build 1,700 new treatment beds and train up to 500 health care workers every week.

With Turmoil Roiling Abroad, Why Aren't Oil Prices Bubbling Up?

Conflict in oil-producing regions usually sends oil prices higher. But the cost of oil has actually dropped, despite turmoil in the Middle East. Economists say it's a matter of supply and demand.

With Debt Collection, Your Bank Account Could Be At Risk

A 1968 federal law allows debt collectors not only to garnish wages but to take from a debtor's bank account. Consumer advocates say the outdated law is overly punitive and out of touch with reality.

Tommy Boggs, Influential Lobbyist, Dies At 73

Boggs changed the lobbying profession by recognizing how power in Washington was becoming more diffuse.

Could Ebola Become As Contagious As The Flu?

Currently, Ebola is known to spread only through contact with body fluids. Some people have worried that Ebola could start spreading through the air. But scientists say that's not likely.

Minnesota Vikings Reinstate Peterson, Who Says He's Not A Child Abuser

Days after he was arrested and benched over charges that he abused his 4-year-old son by punishing him with a wooden switch, NFL star running back Adrian Peterson has been reinstated.

Medals Of Honor Recognize Harrowing Battle And A Dying Act

President Obama awarded the medals to two soldiers who served in Vietnam. Bennie Adkins, who suffered 18 body wounds, reflects on "a horrible, horrible type of battle."

Expanding Mission In Iraq, U.S. Strikes Fighters South Of Baghdad

The attacks were conducted in support of Iraqi Security Forces, marking the first time the U.S. has used air power outside of its original mission to protect U.S. assets.

Iraq's Artists Defy Extremists With Bows, Brushes And A Low Profile

The musicians and artists of Baghdad work under a government that prefers religious festivals to classical concerts. But with a little cunning, they're finding ways to keep the arts alive.

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