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How The Islamic State Smuggles Oil To Fund Its Campaign

As Islamic State militants have marched across Syria and Iraq, oil smuggling has been a major part of their strategy. They have targeted oil fields and refineries and work with a range of middlemen.

Following Ferguson, Senate Weighs Use Of Military-Grade Equipment

A committee is looking at how federal programs have equipped thousands of local police and sheriff's departments with gear made for warfare, and whether more oversight is needed.

Harvard Study Says Economy Is 'Doing Half Its Job.' Guess Which Half

An alumni survey by the school found much more optimism about the future of America's companies than that of its workers. More than 4 in 10 think employee pay and benefits are set to shrink.

U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

The federal budget for bioscience has undergone big swings since 2000. Some scientists are now out of work and others are abandoning the ambitious, creative ideas that fuel discovery.

Scientists Doubt That Meteor Caused Crater In Nicaragua

Authorities first said the 40-foot crater outside Managua's international airport was caused by a meteor that may have broken off from an Earth-passing asteroid. But scientists are skeptical.

High U.S. Support For Airstrikes, Low Numbers For Obama, Poll Says

In a new poll by The Washington Post and ABC News, Americans are increasingly in favor of strikes in Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State, as President Obama's ratings drift to near-record lows.

In Korea, Adoptees Fight To Change Culture That Sent Them Overseas

Two years ago, South Korea passed a law informed by the experiences of the 160,000 people who were adopted to other countries after World War II. Steve Haruch examines the law's history and legacy.

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