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California Enacts 'Yes Means Yes' Law, Defining Sexual Consent

The new law requires an "affirmative consent" and states that consent can't be given if someone is asleep or incapacitated by drugs or alcohol.

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra President Resigns

Dr. Stanley Romenstein has resigned as president and CEO of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. The collective bargaining agreement between the orchestra’s players association and ASO leadership expired on Sept. 6 and a new agreement has not been reached. In a statement, Romenstein said he believed his leadership of the orchestra was getting in the way of new agreement. ““I believe that my continues leadership of the ASO would be an impediment to our reaching a new labor agreement with the ASO’s musicians,” Dr. Romanstein said in the statement, released Monday afternoon .

Japan's Mt. Ontake Is Still Erupting As Questions Emerge About Warnings

At least 36 people are feared dead following Saturday's eruption that caught hundreds of hikers by surprise. Another plume of ash and gas has complicated rescue efforts, which again have been halted.

Who Will Win The 2014 World Series?

If the oddsmakers are right, two Los Angeles teams will be the only ones left standing when the World Series begins in late October. But back east, some fans are pulling for a Beltway Series.

4 Years Of Lessons Learned About Drugmakers' Payments To Doctors

American doctors received at least $1.4 billion in payments from drug companies last year. What did the companies get for their money?

Spanish Court Blocks Catalonia's Independence Vote

Spain's central government in Madrid had appealed to the court to stop the vote, which had been approved with strong support from Catalonia's parliament and local governments.

Germany Red-Faced Over Military Equipment Failures

The country's defense minister says Germany currently can't fulfill its long-term NATO commitments because of a widespread grounding of its military planes and helicopters.

Lessons Learned From The Atlanta Public Schools Cheating Scandal

The trial of a dozen former educators and administrators accused of cheating in the Atlanta Public Schools is now underway. During opening statements this morning, a prosecutor said those educators conspired to fix students' test scores. Jurors will not hear arguments from lawyers for former superintendent Beverly Hall. Her trial was delayed because she's undergoing treatment for cancer. GPB’s Rickey Bevington spoke with Maureen Downey, who covers education policy for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, about lessons other school systems can learn from the APS cheating scandal

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