Fri., August 3, 2012 7:31am (EDT)

WORKING: A New Boss
By Joshua Stewart
Updated: 2 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
Brandon Smith says every new boss will bring his or her own set of values and reshape the department or organization’s culture rather than adapting to what’s already in place. He suggests a key to dealing with that transition is to meet early with your boss and talk about their background and expectations. (Photo Courtesy of <a href=http://www.flickr.com/photos/lokner/4164251472/>Michael Lokner via Flickr</a>.)
Brandon Smith says every new boss will bring his or her own set of values and reshape the department or organization’s culture rather than adapting to what’s already in place. He suggests a key to dealing with that transition is to meet early with your boss and talk about their background and expectations. (Photo Courtesy of Michael Lokner via Flickr.)
Everyone leaves a job for new opportunities from time to time. And on Working, we’ve talked about how to make that a graceful transition.

Sometimes, though, it’s the boss who is leaving and you who are staying. That could mean fundamental changes in your workplace.

Brandon Smith offers some suggestions for making that transition and dealing with its inherent uncertainty.

Brandon Smith teaches about leadership, communication, and workplace culture at Emory University's Goizueta Business School. More of his advice is on his blog and at theworkplacetherapist.com. While you’re there, ask him your workplace or career question. We might use your question on a future radio segment.