Tue., July 10, 2012 2:58pm (EDT)

Sales Tax Holiday Is Late For Some
By Ellen Reinhardt
Updated: 2 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
For the first time since 2009, Georgia is having a sales tax holiday to help families get school supplies. But it may not help everyone.  The sales tax holiday is scheduled for August 10th and 11th. Clothing and shoes that cost less than $100 will be tax exempt, as well as school supplies. Computers that cost less than a thousand dollars will also be tax exempt.( photo courtesy of Bill Geideck)
For the first time since 2009, Georgia is having a sales tax holiday to help families get school supplies. But it may not help everyone. The sales tax holiday is scheduled for August 10th and 11th. Clothing and shoes that cost less than $100 will be tax exempt, as well as school supplies. Computers that cost less than a thousand dollars will also be tax exempt.( photo courtesy of Bill Geideck)
For the first time since 2009, Georgia is having a sales tax holiday to help families get school supplies. But it may not help everyone.

The sales tax holiday is scheduled for August 10th and 11th. Clothing and shoes that cost less than $100 will be tax exempt, as well as school supplies. Computers that cost less than a thousand dollars will also be tax exempt.

Alicia Holton, who lives in Perry, says that’s too late to help her get supplies for her four children.


“Well for us in Houston County it won’t really be beneficial because our kids will have already gone back to school. We go back August first. So we will have already gotten those items.”

Rick McAllister with the Georgia Retail Association says some districts don’t begin school until after Labor Day.


“You can’t get it right unless you go so far back, like into early July. And so the legislature does the best job they can at picking


a weekend that’s not too far into it.”

He says families can still benefit by waiting until the sales tax weekend to get big ticket items. This year, that includes computer Notebooks, which had not been previously included.

McAllister says the sales tax holiday benefits everyone. Retailers see more business. And he says consumers also buy more items that are not tax-exempt. So he believes on balance, the state won’t lose any money.