Wed., June 29, 2011 2:30pm (EDT)

Drought Leads To Dead Fish
By Josephine Bennett
Updated: 3 years ago

ALBANY, Ga.  —  
Radium Springs before drought (photo courtesy Georgia Department of Natural Resources)
Radium Springs before drought (photo courtesy Georgia Department of Natural Resources)
Georgia’s drought is to blame for hundreds of dead fish in South Georgia near Albany. It’s a case of too many fish and not enough water.

Radium Springs is the largest natural spring in Georgia. Now, wildlife officials say it’s just a mud hole.

Rob Weller with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources says the spring, which connects to the Flint River, stopped flowing. Fish were stranded in small pool of water, which killed them.

“If you have one or two goldfish in a bowl they do just fine. But, if you all of the sudden put 30 or 40 goldfish in the same small bowl then there won’t be enough oxygen for all of them.”

Weller says he’s never seen the Flint River so low. The state bought Radium Springs in 1998 to serve as a refuge for the Gulf Striped Bass which needs cold water to survive Georgia summers.