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Wednesday, April 6, 2011 - 12:28pm

Can You Quack “Aflac”?

Updated: 3 years ago.
Columbus-based Aflac is having open casting calls for the voice of its famous spokesduck. The auditions are scheduled in six cities, including a casting call in Atlanta earlier this week on Monday and Tuesday. The company also solicited video and audio auditions through April 1. (Photo Courtesy of Jezzebelle via Flickr.)

Around the country, people are trying to quack their way to fame as the new voice of the Aflac spokesduck.

The Columbus-based insurance company is having open casting calls in six cities, including Atlanta earlier this week on Monday and Tuesday. Aflac also solicited video and audio auditions online, but those had to be in by April 1.

A variety of performers and dreamers applied for the open audition -- no script necessary. It's just variations on one word: Aflac.

The job description includes requirements such as “Must be able to present complex information clearly and concisely into an effective reading of the word ‘Aflac.’”

The description also noted applicants should have a unique and memorable voice and bilingual skills for the English and Spanish duck.

Aflac promised updates on the search in a couple of weeks on the duck’s Facebook page.

Company spokeswoman Laura Kane said the duck will survive the loss of its original voice, comedian Gilbert Gottfried. Gottfried was fired over insensitive Twitter posts about the Japan earthquake.

Aflac is a big health insurer in Japan, but the voice of the duck there had a softer tone and it wasn't Gottfried.

It’s too late to submit your video or audio, but you can find out about the search and read the full job description at www.quackaflac.com.

Click here to see a photo gallery of the Atlanta auditions from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

And a few other auditions uploaded to YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpK6wU3TxtU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FFEbTVVvqw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DT5_cmD_Zjo

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Material from the Associated Press is included in this report.

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