Mon., January 31, 2011 9:38am (EST)

Duncan Urges Black Men To Go Into Teaching
By Associated Press
Updated: 3 years ago

ATLANTA  —  
It is estimated that more than 1 million teachers are expected to retire in the coming decade. Federal officials are looking to fill the vacancies with a more diverse workforce. (Photo courtesy photos.com.)
It is estimated that more than 1 million teachers are expected to retire in the coming decade. Federal officials are looking to fill the vacancies with a more diverse workforce. (Photo courtesy photos.com.)
Education Secretary Arne Duncan and filmmaker Spike Lee are calling for more black men to become teachers. In an event Monday at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Duncan said just 2 percent of the nation's 3 million teacher workforce are black males.

He said federal officials have an opportunity to diversify that workforce as more than a million teachers are expected to retire in the next decade.

Duncan and Lee appeared with U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson and Rep. John Lewis at Morehouse College on Monday for a town hall meeting with students at the country's only all-male historically black college.

Federal officials estimate more than 1 million teachers will retire in the coming decade, and federal officials are hoping to fill some of those vacancies with a more diverse workforce.

The meeting comes a week after President Barack Obama's call during his State of the Union address for more people to become teachers.

Duncan Tells Atlanta School Board to "Get It's Act Together"

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is urging the Atlanta school board to "get its act together" after a major accrediting agency put the school district on probation.

Duncan said he met with Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed on Monday before attending an event at Morehouse College. He said board members have "lost sight of why they were elected."

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools put the district on probation this month and urged it to take six steps by Sept. 30 to keep its accreditation.

Losing that status can strip the district of millions of dollars in grant money and could put students at risk of not gaining admission to colleges.