Wed., January 12, 2011 6:38pm (EST)

Recycling Haitian Debris is Safe and Cheap
By Noel Brown
Updated: 3 years ago

ATLANTA, Ga.   —  
DeRoches says one of the biggest problems facing reconstruction in Haiti is finding a place to put the thousands of tons of debris cluttering the capitol city. (photo by: United Nations Photo via Flickr)
DeRoches says one of the biggest problems facing reconstruction in Haiti is finding a place to put the thousands of tons of debris cluttering the capitol city. (photo by: United Nations Photo via Flickr)
Researchers at Georgia Tech have figured out a way to recycle rubble from the Haitian earthquake to make concrete. Noel Brown reports the work could help provide a safe and cheap way to rebuild the country after much of it was destroyed a year ago today.

Since the earthquake a group of concrete experts from Georgia Tech have been visiting Haiti’s Capitol city, Port Au Prince to gather samples of debris. They found that the rubble could be used to make new concrete many times stronger than what was destroyed.

Leading the team is Reginald DesRohes a professor in Tech’s school of civil and environmental engineering.

He says one of the biggest problems facing reconstruction in Haiti is finding a place to put the thousands of tons of debris cluttering the capitol city.

"If we can alleviate that by using much of it I think that solves a major problem."

DesRoches and his colleagues recently published their findings in The Bulletin of the American Ceramic Society.

He says he is waiting for a resolution to Haiti’s ongoing political strife before sharing the research with the country’s leaders.