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  • The Mother of the Girl Scouts: Juliette Gordon Low

    Raised to be a lady of leisure and high society, Juliette Gordon Low's life changed entirely when she was seeking a new direction for herself after her marriage dissolved. In London, she met the founder of England's Girl Guides. The patrols she started for the girls of Savannah became the Girl Scouts eventually enlisting the First Ladies of the United States as honorary presidents of the organization.

    Support Materials

    Discuss

    1. Why was Juliette Gordon Low seen as a failure in Savannah during this time?

    2. How has Juliette Low's legacy lived on today?

    Expansion

    1. Invite a Girl Scout or troop leader to speak to your class. Analyze how Juliette Gordon Low's original vision is still reflected in the club today.

    Vocabulary

    boarding school: a pre-university level school where most or all of the students reside (live at) while school is in session
    southern belle: a characterization representing a young woman of the American Deep South's upper socioeconomic, typically plantation-owning, class
    facade: an outward appearance that is maintained to conceal a less pleasant or creditable reality
    Girl Guides: a Scouting movement, originally and still largely for girls and women, that provides training in life skills, leadership, and decision making

    For Teachers

    Discussion Guide

    1. Why was Juliette Gordon Low seen as a failure in Savannah during this time? 
    For women during the late 1800s, their success was determined by a long, healthy marriage and children. Because Juliet Low's marriage did not produce children and ended in divorce, she was considered a failure by these standards. 

    2. How has Juliette Low's legacy lived on today?
    Julliette Low established a group for girls that taught them the importance of friendship, education, and community. After 100 years, millions of girls from around the world are a part of the Girl Scouts and embrace those original values.

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