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Sparked by the move to integrate schools after the Brown v. Board decision, African Americans pressed for equal rights under the law in response to nearly one hundred years of mistreatment. Black Georgians attended segregated schools, were disenfranchised at the ballot, and kept out of all-white businesses.

Atlanta's Example in the Civil Rights Movement

Herschelle Challenor, a graduate of Spelman College, describes the challenges of segregation in Atlanta during the 1950s. Claude Sitton, a reporter for the New York Times, states that...

The Civil Rights Movement: Freedom School

Marie Cochran, an art instructor at Georgia Southern University, was one of the first children to integrate the schools in her hometown of Toccoa. Her art installation, "Freedom School," first...

The Civil Rights Movement: Singing Freedom

Albany native Rutha Mae Harris recalls life in the segregated town of Albany. In 1961 activists like African-American activists like Harris and Charles Sherood organized marches in the streets and...

The Cultural Impact of Television

Television changed the way Americans entertained themselves. Baby boom generation members Steve Oliver and Sarah Fountain and University of Georgia’s College of Journalism professor Dr. Allison...

The Economic Impact of Racial Discrimination

Farmer Felder Daniels, Doug Bachtel, a demographer at the University of Georgia, Lillie Rosser, a former housecleaner and now an assistant pastor at an Atlanta church, and Tena Butler, who...

The Personal Impact of Television

Tony Grooms, an author and poet living in Atlanta, describes how events he saw on television as a young boy became topics in his stories, like police using powerful fire hoses to stop the...